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Getting plastered!


Ken Allthumbs's Avatar
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05-04-08, 07:31 PM   #1  
Getting plastered!

Hello.

I finally got my roof replaced last summer. But not before the leaky SOB put some bad water damage on the wet plaster walls and ceilings in my dining area, kitchen and front door vestibule. The kitchen was a small patch, and I attempted this with spakle without much success. It looks OK after painting if you don't look up. But the other rooms are larger and trickier.

The rough plaster so far seems to be in good shape, I haven't played too much with it yet. It's the "finnishing" plaster that's AFU.

Besides hiring a plasterer I can't afford, what suggestions for an extreme novice at this does anyone have?

Signed appropriately;
Ken Allthumbs

 
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marksr's Avatar
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05-05-08, 03:00 AM   #2  
Spackling is only for minor repairs! Could you supply some pics?

I don't have any experience with using plaster but have used drywall products to succesfully patch plaster. Exactly what type of damage to you have?

Don't forget any water stains will need to be sealed with a solvent based primer.


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05-05-08, 07:55 AM   #3  
Definitions are in order. Are you talking about true plaster - or drywall....? How old is the house (if you're not sure of the medium)...

 
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05-05-08, 12:50 PM   #4  
Sorry, don't have the means to supply pics. As I said in the original post, it is wet plaster. House built in 1951. I sometimes wish it were drywall. I know many who could help with it, but they are lost when it comes to this stuff. Best suggestion was to remove all plaster down to the lath, and replace with drywall, which would work in the vestibule, but the dining area has walls that curve towards the ceiling with a 1/4 inch recesss AT the ceiling.

Ken

 
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05-05-08, 04:24 PM   #5  
What exactly is wrong with the plaster? Is it crumbly or falling off but the hard coat is intact?

Setting compounds like durabond work fairly well for plaster repairs for those of us not skilled in plaster work.


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05-05-08, 06:50 PM   #6  
Well, so far I've been afraid to chip away the finnish plaster in the dining area, but some has fallen off in the vestibule, and but for some slight "dusting", the rough plaster seems solid. The dining area's damage is about six-seven feet across one wall tapering to about three-four feet to and across the ceiling.

Ken

 
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05-06-08, 03:25 AM   #7  
I'd scrape off the loose, prime the hard coat and then apply a couple of coats of durabond. I've done this a few times when prepping an old house for paint.

Hopefully one of our plaster pros will chime in later with some really good advice


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05-06-08, 06:43 PM   #8  
Tell you what, Mark. I've already gone to other plaster type web sites, and read everything from mixing my own plaster of Paris from scratch, to using "hot mud" to fasten drywall to the spot. None of them mentioned Durabond. If "hot mud" is what durabond is, they never mentioned it by that name. Sounds like a "super glue" brand, actually . But it's noted, and I'll look for it and even try it in a much smaller, unimportant area just to find what it's like to work with. Thanks much.

Appropriately;
Ken Allthumbs

 
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05-07-08, 03:26 AM   #9  
I don't know much about plaster but in drywall 'hot mud' is a slang term for durabond. Because it is a setting type mud, it creates heat as it dries. It comes in different setting times with 90 minute being the slowest - longest working time. You only want to mix up what you can use before it sets up. Any unused after it sets up must be thrown out.

easy sand [misnomer ] is another brand of setting compound


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05-07-08, 05:39 PM   #10  
I have had 100% success repairing plaster to smooth. You must scrape off all the 1/8 inch bad plaster. Even if it looks good take a hard wide putty knife with a painting pan to catch the debris and keep scraping until it resists. It may look like one square foot but end up 4 square feet or more. You say the rough coat is ok, that is good! I myself vacuum the rough coat then prime. USG brand Durabond regular (hot mud mix) is perfect for this repair. Plan on three coats sanding between each. Don't build this stuff up as it is a pain to sand down. Thin is ok to sand but not thick. Make sure its feathered out. Prime again the repair with a stain killing primer and two finish coats. Piece of cake!!

 
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05-08-08, 05:47 PM   #11  
Okay, what the other users have suggested may be fine, but my experience has shown otherwise.
Drywall mud, spackle, durabond are alright materials for DRYWALL but are definitely wrong for good plaster repair.
Over time I've in fact had to teach myself how to replaster entire rooms, walls and ceilings from the lathe up...

THE BEST way to fix any break or damage to any plaster surface is to first CAREFULLY chip away the crumbling or loose plaster. Do NOT go crazy and chip away strong plaster. Then at the edges you'll want to feather away the paint edge about an inch.

Now here is what you'll need to get the best result "Structo-Lite Basecoat Plaster with Perlite" you should be able to get this at any PROFESSIONAL Cement/Masonry Builders yards. Don't try finding it at HomeDepot. It should cost about $8.00 for a 60 pound bag. Next you'll need a big Hock and a regular flat cement trowel, a corded drill, a mixing paddle and two five gallon buckets(one for mixing, one for clean water).
Now wet down the exposed lathe and old plaster edges with a sqeeze-bottle.
Mix 4 parts plaster to one part COLD water (hot water will set the plaster in minutes, cold leaves a working time of about 30-40 minutes) to get a "pudding" like consistency. Then just scoop a big dollop of mix onto the Hock, place the edge of the Hock at the wall and with the trowel just "push" plaster off the Hock and up onto the wall. And trowel smooth. Keep doing this until the area is all covered.
To add texture and to feather in at the old seems, while the plaster is damp, but has had time to harden just a little use a wet terry-cloth rag and dab or swipe at the plaster to get the desired finish. Heavily textured walls may need a natural sponge dabbing.

May I recommend doing what I did of buying a few sheets of drywall and testing your skill and technique on those before attempting to work on the walls themselves?

edit: I forgot to mention the best reason to use plaster for plaster repair; its cleaner. With DuraBond or Mud there's shrinking and sanding which makes dust. There's no shrinking or sanding with plaster.
Also if your walls have a super smooth finish, you'll also need the "Diamond Veneer plaster" which you'll mix to a creamy soup consistency and apply same as before.


Last edited by ScrewLoose; 05-08-08 at 06:09 PM. Reason: more info
 
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05-08-08, 07:50 PM   #12  
Right on the bag of Durabond it says that its good for plaster. I have never seen a failure in my career. Being a rework contractor I always go back to the same customers years later. If your rough coat is in good condition you will not need Structo-Lite. Plaster would work I believe but this is not as DIY friendly. Also consider they say minimum 90 days before you can paint it. Durabond you can paint the same day.

 
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05-09-08, 06:25 AM   #13  
Posted By: nagra4s I have never seen a failure in my career.
And I could walk you through some 40 houses where DuraBond was used to patch/fix plaster as is failing abysmally with peeling, cracking and flaking. In fact a local company that fancied itself a Plaster Repair Contractor is being sued (for Fraud, Misrepresentation and Damages) by about a hundred people (I think...) for its faulty use of DuraBond that has since failed instead of the actual Plaster as they advertised and contracted.
Posted By: nagra4s Being a rework contractor I always go back to the same customers years later. If your rough coat is in good condition you will not need Structo-Lite. Plaster would work I believe but this is not as DIY friendly.
Not as DIY friendly? Possibly, but I've definitely found actual plater to be easier than Mud or DuraBond in plaster repair, especially when matching wall texture of the existing plaster.
Posted By: nagra4s Also consider they say minimum 90 days before you can paint it.
I've never heard of that. In fact the Owner (and son of the founder) of a Plasterers Union affiliated company that does all the local Hospitals and Commercial buildings told me that I can paint plaster after 3 to 5 days with Sherwin-Williams oil masonry primer then a day for drying to top with color.


Last edited by ScrewLoose; 05-09-08 at 06:26 AM. Reason: correction
 
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05-09-08, 07:25 AM   #14  
I agree with the 3-5 day wait on painting plaster. I haven't painted any new plaster in a long time but the paint store used to give you a little strip to tape on the plaster. If the tape turned red you could paint...... or maybe it was the other way around...... it's been a long time

Like Rick, I've never encountered any issues with using durabond for plaster repair. Perhaps the company with all the failures failed to prep the old plaster correctly. I've always believed if you are unable to get the base dust free, you must prime before applying any mud.


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05-09-08, 05:53 PM   #15  
I stand corrected on the cure time for plaster. I looked in my garage so sure I used to read this on cans of paint/primer. I have years of cans dating back at least ten years and they all say "must be cured hard and dry".
You should know ScrewLoose!

As far as repairs go I have way too much experience to not recommend Durabond regular/drywall for plaster repairs. I have never had a callback or seen the job years later to make me feel like I need a new plan.

Preparation is always the key!!

 
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05-10-08, 06:14 AM   #16  
3-5 days isnt really enough time for plaster to properly dry & cure before painting. I would say no less than 2 weeks to a month depending on the season and time it was plastered. Some Coves & cornices take almost a month to dry alone.
Ive plastered for a long time and we still do the odd plastered room to this day. Mostly rounded rooms with no corner's, ceilings that cant be drywalled & walls if there are no angles in that room.

Durabond, I have never had a problem useing for small plaster repairs either on hardwall or perlight. You cant beat that stuff. Ive plastered useing Lime & guageing over roughed up durabond on new drywalled houses that were done so bad.

On larger areas with the rough coat exposed , I would use Lime with Slowset & Quickset Gaugeing.

Ive seen alot of good advice on these forums & there are some very smart people & tradesmen in here. Since im a newbie i'll say that also. Excuse my typeing if it ever seems offensive & my wording is off a bit.

Have a good weekend & A Happy Mothers day to all mom's out there also.

 
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05-10-08, 08:38 PM   #17  
Thanks anyway, but it won't help me. The wall in the dining area curves overhead about a foot to a point. Then there's a 1/4 inch recess to the remaining ceiling. It's actually a nice effect. But it's going to be a B-Yotch to repair!

Ken Allthumbs

 
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