Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Depression in the ceiling


's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-00, 03:55 AM   #1  
About a month ago I had some furniture delivered. As the movers were bringing in my couch they had to make a hard right turn in a hallway and then stand the couch up straight to angle it into our room.

Unfortunately when they stood the couch up they made a depression in my ceiling. It wasn't something I noticed until a few weeks after. The (drywall?) ceiling was not broken through but you can definitely see a rounded depression up there where the pressure of the corner of the couch did some damage.

Any suggestions on what to do? Should I have a handyman come out and replace the hallway ceiling?

Thanks!

 
Sponsored Links
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-00, 05:11 AM   #2  
No need to replace ceiling, I would suggest finding a mudman to come in and, if is not broken, he can repair with joint compound, match the texture and repainting the ceiling may be nesasary. Around here most of the painters are also mudmen, try contacting a painter and he can refer a mudman if he is not one.

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-00, 05:12 AM   #3  
Thanks! I'll look into finding a "mudman" in the area.

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-00, 10:10 PM   #4  
Newhomeowner:
How big in diameter (approximately) is this depression and roughly how deep is it?

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-29-00, 06:14 AM   #5  
About 4 to 5 inches in diameter...no more than 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-29-00, 09:24 PM   #6  
Newhomeowner:

Go out and buy a cheap Marshalltown 11 inch by 5 inch trowel, a small container of either joint compound or premixed finishing plaster, a light that you can hold close to the ceiling and a sanding block with a 100 grit sanding screen.

Joint filler has glue in it, so it's much harder to sand smooth than finishing plaster, but for a small repair like this the difference in effort will not be huge.

Put some joint filler or premixed finishing plaster on the trowel and spread it flat over the depression. Scrape off any excess with the edge of the trowel using the flat ceiling on either side of the dent to screed the repair plaster smooth over the dent. Allow that to dry. Any gypsum based mud like joint filler or finishing plaster shrinks as it dries, so you'll have to wait for the first coat to dry before you fill in the depression. Apply a thin coat to fill in the shrinkage and wait for that to dry.

Now, hold a light next to the repair to exagerate the roughness and sand the patch smooth. You should see a small spot in the middle of the shrinkage where there's a small secondary depression. Fill in the spot and sand smooth repeatedly until it appears reasonably smooth when inspected with the light exagerating how rough it is. Then, to anyone viewing it under normal lighting, it will look like it was done by a pro.

Prime with latex primer and paint. You might have to repaint the whole ceiling because paint gradually gets darker as it ages, and the repair will probably be visible.

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-29-00, 09:26 PM   #7  
Newhomeowner:

Slip a new 3M Scotchbrite scouring pad between the hand sander and the screen to prevent the screen from clogging with dust.

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

10-01-00, 05:19 AM   #8  
Nestor,

Thanks for this solution. I'll give it a try in the next few weeks and I'll let you know how it goes.

Thanks again!

 
's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

10-01-00, 08:54 AM   #9  
Newhomeowner:

If you run into problems, post again. I've noticed that I often don't explain things fully enough simply because those particular things are blindingly obvious to me, and so my brain assumes that they will also be obvious to everyone. That's a problem that anyone who posts a reply in these forums soon discovers.


 
Search this Thread