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Drywall Repair


mwelch1904's Avatar
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11-27-08, 09:38 AM   #1  
Drywall Repair

Hello all and happy Thanksgiving. I want to repair the 6,003 holes in my walls this weekend and paint. I have tried to fix these holes a few times before but never came out right as you could see the smoothness from the patches compared to the very very light textured walls(no clue how to match) you can also see the lining where i put the new drywall up as most of it cracked.
This is just one room. The holes vary from fist sized holes, door knob holes, back side of a screwdriver hole, bottom of a two liter bottle sized hole and two stud to stud sized patches which I think I could just keep mudding until the they are nice and flush.

? #1 How should i get rid of this texture?
I really don't want smooth walls but it is too hard to match texture as there a million textures out there and some come from rollers and the way you roll.
? #2 One of the patches I put up before goes to the corner, how do i fill in the corner and sand it?
? #3 How do I cut out the holes? What tools?
? How do I attach patches?
At what points do I add mud? And how much?
Previously my sanding came out horribly and so much dust you could bathe in it. I read about a pole sander and it sounds like the best way to keep patches flush, will this work?
Please be very detailed. I really want to replace all the drywall on the walls so I could add insulation but oh well. Thanks in advance

 
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11-27-08, 11:20 AM   #2  
Let me give you a few general tips that's I've learned over the years. The tools you need are a T square, chalk line, utility knife, keyhole saw, putty knives, screw gun and a clean bucket

The first thing is, patches with compound are designed to be smooth. I wouldn't be able to match the texture of the wall unless I use textured paint.

I recently just started to use setting compound (sheetrock easy sand) as opposed to the ready mix. It's a powder and has to be mixed with an egg beater type tool that you put in a drill but it saves time in the long run.

You can just use the mix over small size holes. Larger holes may require a blowout patch or a piece of sheetrock screwed to the studs.

For the soda bottle/fist size hole, square it with a key hole saw. Make it large enough to slip two pieces of lath behind it so the lath extends above and below the hole on the inside of the wall. Hold the lath tight by pulling it toward you and screw it in from the outside above and below the hole. Then cut a piece of sheetrock to fit in the hole and screw it to the lath.

For the stud to stud patches, cut back to the studs and put a nailer on both sides. That way you don't have to try to cut the sheet rock in such a way that half the stud shows. Cut your sheetrock and screw it to the stud. Mix the compound and apply thin coats. Use tape on the stud to stud pieces. The setting compound that I use will dry in 2 hours and you can apply the next coat in the places that they are needed.

Sometimes, I just use caulking in the corners.

 
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11-27-08, 11:57 AM   #3  
Thanks. Is this the nailer? Benefits - The Nailer do they sell them at lowes or somewhere similar? Also when do I put the tape on there? What is the point of the tape when we sand it away? Should I use the mesh tape? Last question what is the best way to sand? Orbital, flat, hand or the pole sander? Thanks again

 
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11-27-08, 03:53 PM   #4  
Ok, let me try again - got knocked off line as I hit post reply

You should never sand the tape. The tape is applied to a thin layer of joint compond and smoothed out with your broad knife. The j/c acts as the glue for the tape. After it is mudded in and dry, apply a 2nd coat of joint compound. Depending on how neatly you apply the 2nd coat will determine if you need to do any sanding prior to the 3rd coat. Any sanding you do should always stop short of exposing the tape. The 'sticky' mesh tape should only be used with a setting compound - it has poor track record with ready mix joint compound. paper tape is always superior.

Sanding j/c is always messy! Personally I'd rather apply an extra coat of mud than do any extra sanding. Never use a power sander on joint compound. A pole sander works well bu it will produce a fair amount of dust. You don't want to and with just sandpaper and your fingers - this can result in uneven finish. The flat surface of the pole sander [or anything similiar] helps to sand the j/c smooth/straight. Another option which I often use in occupied dwellings is to use a wet/damp sponge to soften the j/c and smear it around fairly evenly - this creates no dust. But this doesn't do as good a job as sandpaper - just not dusty. This only works with ready mix joint compound - will not work with setting compounds.

I have no idea about the 'nailer' and how it pertains to drywall repair. What Pulpo is describing is adding a 2x to the nearby studs, giving you something to nail the patch piece of drywall to. Another method for smaller holes is to insert a piece of wood, longer than the hole, pull it tightly to the backside of the drywall and secure it with screws. You would then attach the patch piece to the wood.


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11-27-08, 07:45 PM   #5  
marksr answered your questions. I would like to add another way to sand. There are sanding blocks that don't require sand paper. Just to recap. A nailer is just anouther piece of wood screwed to the studs.

If you can find someone to help you the first time through, you'll understand it really fast. It's hard to get the hang of taping and spackling over the net.

 
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11-28-08, 09:11 AM   #6  
thank you for the good information. so do you think if i paint over the textured walls and the patch with textured paint then it would come out equal?

 
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11-28-08, 10:50 AM   #7  
I'm not overly fond of texture paint and that isn't how I would texture a repair. Most textures can be duplicated by thinning down joint compound and applying it in various ways.

Probably the most common wall texture is orange peel. On large areas you would want to thin j/c down to near paint consistency and spray it with a hopper gun. Small repairs can be textured by applying the same thinned down j/c with a sponge. There are also aersol cans of orange peel texture available. It may take a little trial and error to get the j/c consitency right. You can either practice on a piece of cardboard or even on the wall - it's easy to remove while wet or sand off when dry, and then try again

If you could better describe or preferably provide a pic of your texture, we should be able to help you match it.


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11-28-08, 11:24 AM   #8  
ok i will soon but right now im having trouble with the brace for the doorknob patches, i cut the square matched up a piece of drywall and used two shims as a backbrace. i did one going from left to right and the other top to bottom and the drywall is poking out on one end and the screws wont go in far enough into the wall to cover so i pushed harder and i wish i didnt. very frustrating, i dont have any extra flat wood laying around. I know it seems im making this alot harder than it should be but im trying to learn over a computer so it wont be as easy. Could you take me step by step to make the backbrace? I wish i just had a brick wall

 
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11-28-08, 01:11 PM   #9  
okay well i decided to use half of each stud for all my holes so i wont have to worry about making a back brace...as far as paint texture, i think it is the orange peel because i see this texture in alot of houses and it looks like a oranges peel. I just don't understand how to create it. You say its created from the mud? Do i have to buy something to mix it in the mud? Can u take me step by step to create this texture? thanks

 
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11-28-08, 03:54 PM   #10  
Take some joint compound and mix it with water until you get it in the neighborhood of paint consistency. Ideally you would spray it on the wall - that's how it was originally done but decent repairs can be done using a sponge. Basically you use the sponge to pat the texture over the repaired area. if the texture is to heavy - you need to thin it more, if it's too light - the j/c is too thin.

Installing a piece of wood to secure a patch to in an open hole is fairly simple. Just insert the wood and screw the top above the hole and the bottom below. You want the screw to just push into the drywall but not break the paper. if it breaks the paper, it's holding power is reduced. Like most things, the more you do it the easier it becomes.


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