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repairing stress cracks


bigfun's Avatar
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01-14-09, 10:08 AM   #1  
repairing stress cracks

Hello, I have 2 stress cracks in drywall.
I have cathedral ceiling trusses at both ends of my home with reg. trusses in between.
The cracks begin where the 1st and last regular trusses sit on the top of a wall.
One crack runs 24" vertical, the other 12" horizontal.
They appeared about a year after the house was built (1998) and have never been repaired.
I want a repair that will last and not crack again with the changing seasons. (michigan)

 
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01-14-09, 03:14 PM   #2  
Welcome to the forums!

After making sure the drywall is well secured to the framing - add screws if needed, you should use paper tape and joint compound to cover the cracks and a couple of coats of j/c to cover the tape. Is there any texture to be duplicated?


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01-15-09, 03:58 AM   #3  
Hello, surfaces are paint only.
After doing some searching I beleive that I need to address the root cause of the cracks.
Movement of the trusses?
So I would have to drive some heavy duty skrews into the trusses and top plate from the attic or cut a hole in the wall in order to skrew them from the inside of the home?
Also, if I skrew the trusses down, would it make a difference if I do it in winter or summer?

 
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01-15-09, 03:34 PM   #4  
I'm just a painter but I wouldn't think that it would be likely that the truss system is moving around.


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01-16-09, 12:22 PM   #5  
Are your cracks in a straight line or diagonal? This makes a difference because if they are in a straight line then its the joints that are failing. If they are diagonal then its structural. The 24" vertical is probably a butt joint that shouldn't be there in the first place. Cut it out. pre fill with quick set then re tape.

 
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02-08-09, 08:58 AM   #6  
stress paint cracks

I also have stress cracks which seem to be just the paint. I was told that there was a spray on product to be used after filling and smoothing the cracks which creates an elastic membrane to paint over, has anyone heard of this?

 
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02-08-09, 11:51 AM   #7  
Welcome to the forums mygiants!

I'm not aware of any spray can product like you describe - I assume it would be some type of texture. There is a masonary paint that is an elastromeric coating which will waterproof and hide minor cracks in stucco.

While paint can crack [often a drying issue] it doesn't really show cracks from stress - it's probably the plaster or joint compound under the paint.


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02-16-09, 02:15 AM   #8  
The bottom chord of truss'(the part that makes your cieling) are bowed not straight from the factory. This is to allow movement as humidity/temperature levels change. This is probably why you have cracking in your cieling. Try just taping the cracked joints, cause this is inexpensive. If it fails strapping the bottom chord(which are your "cieling joists" with brazilian channel and drywall. This i can guarentee will be less likey to crack. Pictures, or actually seeing what is wrong may change my opinion. I assume from what you describe that your roof truss' are moving. and your cieling truss' are staying where they should. I could be envisioning something completely wrong though.

PICTURES ALWAYS. There should be a little staple that shows up when anyone makes a thread here and asks, "would you like to attatch a picture". Not picking on you OP just something that drive me nuts, and im sure does the other board members.

 
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02-17-09, 05:40 AM   #9  
I would open the stress crack then use Durabond joint compound, it's self setting type in brown bags, this stuff gets real hard and will not srink when you use it as your bed coat. also make sure you sand the paint finish so you get a good bond with the ceiling. once it drys in 90 minutes you can shave any lines off then use topping compound to skim coat the repair, then prime and paint. as for the trusses moving since 1998 would say the builder cut corners. not enough nails use when the house was framed. plus if the house was built in the winter months the wood takes longer to dry out. Good luck


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