Best way to level an existing ceiling

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-18-09, 02:58 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 12
Best way to level an existing ceiling

Just installed crown molding in a 150+ year old home. Have one spot that we had to cheat to stay level over a doorway causing an inch gap in a corner from the top of the crown to the ceiling. Thinking of multiple layers of joint compound feathered out. Any other suggestions? Maybe a filler to jc over? Any help appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-19-09, 01:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 82
So you put the trim to the cieling, took a couple steps back and notised the line didnt follow the same line as the casing on your door. Or you are installing crown with a level. If its the first, good eye but you should have cheated it closer than an inch. If its the latter try again without the level. Its a 150 years old and nothing is level anymore if it ever was in the first place.

Oh and the best time to level a cieling is before you put up crown molding.
 
  #3  
Old 02-19-09, 06:21 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 12
Actually installed one half of the room following the ceiling line. When we saw that one section of the ceiling, we did cheat over the door way the crown is off 1/2 over the doorway molding and even with that cheat we landed almost a full inch away from the ceiling. So the ceiling in that one spot is a 1 1/2 off in total. I'm thinking the only way is the many feathered layers of joint compound....
 
  #4  
Old 02-19-09, 07:41 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,994
Hi sweat equity. From the sound of it, you may want to, almost start over. Now before you shoot me, here is what I mean. To apply multiple layers and get anything reasonable, you will need a reference. That’s where you should have started. A common approach would be to strap the ceiling and shim the strapping down as needed so everything is level. Then apply a new layer of say 3/8” sheetrock, tape and paint and you are done. Since I doubt you want to back up that far, you will still need to establish your reference. There are several ways to do that, strings, laser, boards, or however you choose, but you will need a reference to work to.

Try to avoid a lot of fill. In other words, apply some of that 3/8” or ½” sheetrock in places where you can. Glue it and screw it.

Now here’s a part I’m not sure on, but I have used joint compound on thick patches and found it dries slow and shrinks. Perhaps another plaster product would be better, but I can’t name one.

If you are thinking about leveling the perimeter and tapering it out towards the center just a few feet, that can be done, but with the thicknesses you have mentioned, I think you may end up with something less than you want.

Labor intensive and I wish you luck,
Bud
 
  #5  
Old 02-19-09, 01:22 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,804
Setting compunds like durabond or easy sand, dry chemically and won't shrink and crack as they dry like ready mix joint compound which air dries.


almost forgot
Welcome to the forums sweat equity!
 
  #6  
Old 02-25-09, 02:27 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 12
Just an update, went with the joint compound in many layers, with mesh tape. Letting it dry in between each layer. Came out beautiful. Just sanded and primed it today.
Thanks for all your advice.Beer 4U2
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes