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Mixing PVA primer in with Joint Compound.


ameier's Avatar
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03-18-09, 10:57 AM   #1  
Mixing PVA primer in with Joint Compound.

I have this setting type joint compound powder... and some pva primer.

I'm texturing my walls, and I would like to know if I can mix at least some PVA primer in with my joint compound mix.

The goal here is to remove the need for more primer. I ended up mixing a small amount to test, and it didn't crack except where thick globs were.

I've found a ton of info on mixing paint with joint compound, just not much dealing with PVA primer.

Does anyone have any suggestions here? The joint compound with or without primer adheres very well to the painted walls, I'm just hoping to skip priming over the joint compound when I'm done.

Thanks in advance!


Oh, and off topic, but does anyone have an easy to do hand texturing technique that they like more than others? If so, then why?

 
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marksr's Avatar
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03-18-09, 12:58 PM   #2  
You can mix latex paint/primer with joint compound. Most of those who do so, do it so either the ceilings won't have to be painted or the walls will cover with one coat of paint. To do the paint job correctly the texture should be primed after it has dried, doesn't matter if paint was added to the texture. IMO adding paint to texture is an unnecessary expense.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
ameier's Avatar
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03-18-09, 01:06 PM   #3  
Thanks for the reply!

So, primer needs to be placed OVER the joint compound, not just inside it (to be done properly)?

I've set up three different blocks of joint compound, one mixed with primer, one mixed with water and primed (when dry), and another just mixed with water.

I'm going to paint over all three areas and then test (scrub resistance, tape peeling strength, chip resistance).

I'll be posting back here in 48 hours or so, with my findings.

Thanks again for the information.

 
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03-30-09, 12:58 PM   #4  
Results of PVA primer test.

The tests included:
-Scrubbing with steel wool
-Scrubbing with a wire-brush
-Scrubbing with a wet rag
-Chipping with flat-tip screwdriver.

100% Primer Mix
This held up the best, probably because it dried much harder than the others (don't know why, something to do with the primer)...


50% Primer Mix
This held up well, probably because it dried harder than the water mixes, but the adhesion to the surface was basically the same as using a PVA primer ontop of the joint compound.


No primer mix, just primed over joint compound.
I expected this to hold up much better, but it just didn't. The joint compound wasn't hard enough to prevent massive chips from easily forming.


No primer at all, just plain water mixed with joint compound.
Don't do this. Very easy to wipe off.

 
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03-30-09, 04:05 PM   #5  
Your test results are misleading. I'm sure that primer added to the joint compound will make the texture stronger but it still needs primer for the finish paint to preform at it's best. Primers aren't formulated for wear! Their purpose is to seal the substrate so it can accept paint. Paint applied without primer won't be as washable and likely won't look as good.

If your walls are subject to wear with a wire brush, screw driver or steel wool - you might be better off with metal or masonary walls
Good primer followed by 1-2 coats of a quality wall paint should hold up fine u nder most residential settings.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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