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best approach / materials for plaster on brick wall

best approach / materials for plaster on brick wall


  #1  
Old 06-13-09, 02:46 PM
J
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best approach / materials for plaster on brick wall

I'm trying to repair a small area (about 2'x2') of water damage to a plaster wall. I've been reading and talking with people, trying to determine the right materials to use in this case. I'm wondering if you could help me understand if I have the right approach -- or if another approach would be better.

I've posted a picture of the damage. This is the interior side of a brick exterior wall in our 1928 house. The plaster appears to be in two layers, skim coat and brown coat, over a black substance that is directly applied to the brick. The damage ranges from about 1/8" deep where the skim coat has come off, to about 3/4" where the brown coat is completely washed away.

So, here's what I have planned:

1. Finish scraping away any loose material
2. Apply Plaster Weld bonding agent
3. Fill the damage with Structo-Lite Base Coat, leaving about 1/8" of space below the wall surface to allow for a finish coat.
4. Apply a final coat using DAP Patching Plaster, to avoid needing to mix a lime and plaster mix on my own
5. Sand smooth, then prime and paint

Does this approach make sense? Is this the easiest way to achieve a good finish? Are these the right materials to use? Will these materials bond well? Will they expand and contract together so we don't get cracking?

Thanks so much for your help.

Jim
 
  #2  
Old 06-13-09, 04:02 PM
T
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I think there is an even easier way. Use the StructoLite as you say. This is notoriously slow setting so put some alum in your mixing water. Make is strong enough to taste in the water. Screed it off flush a couple of times once with your rod held horizontally and once vertically.

When it has set and dried a day then finish it with some quick setting joint compound like EasySand. It might take a couple of coats. If you mist it with water and have your trowel clean you can trowel the EasySand as smooth as plaster just as it sets.

The reason for doing it this way is because of the small size.
I am not familiar with DAP patching plaster. It might be hard to trowel that smooth hence the advice to go with joint compound.
 
  #3  
Old 06-13-09, 09:01 PM
J
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thanks for the help

Thanks for the advice -- this is a big help. I'll check out the alum and the Easy Sand. DAP's patching plaster is like joint compound, but a bit more wet (and I think with more lime in the mix, but I'm not really sure of the ingredients). It's easy to sand but I haven't tried to trowel it very smooth though.

Jim
 
 

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