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please help - hole in wall - patch job nightmare


Bria1128's Avatar
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09-22-09, 06:04 AM   #1  
please help - hole in wall - patch job nightmare

So we just repainted our bedroom, bought new furniture and it looks great. However, upon trying to hang our flat screen tv we had a little accident that made a hole in the wall!

I bought a self-adhesive dry wall patch, applied liquid plaster, let it dry and then painted it. It looked just ok but I wasn't satisfied.

I proceeded to replaster it, then applied primer to get a better finish and then painted it again.

Needless to say, it looks worse and I am completely bummed. Nevermind the imperfections in the wall, the paint isn't even blending well. (on a side note, does the area primed require multiple coats to match the rest of the wall?)

Is there any way to fix my nightmare? It's behind the flat screen but I know it's there and it really bothers me.

 
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09-22-09, 08:53 AM   #2  
There are a number of ways to repair it, depending on the size of the hole. If it's the size of a fist, (you didn't get mad & punch it, did you?) cut it square, slip a piece of wood lath, about 2 inches higher & lower than the hole, behind it & put 2 screws through the wall, catching the lath on each end. Then cut a piece of sheetrock & screw that to the lath. Tape & spackle. Then sand & paint.

 
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09-22-09, 09:05 AM   #3  
I think you will have to prime and paint the whole wall. In the plastering trade we refer to suction. The suction of the patch is different from the rest of the wall and always will be unless you prime the whole wall and that is not a guarantee that it will match.

Now this assumes that the patch is a good patch. It must be perfect and the texture match must be good. Did you do this? Paint will not hide a bad patch or make it look better.


Now if you have some specific questions about how to make the patch good, fire away. If it is already perfect then try to prime and paint the whole wall and even out the suction and maybe it will match.

 
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09-22-09, 09:07 AM   #4  
Thanks for responding. Rather than doing that although I know that is always an option, what are your thoughts on using a screen cloth to smooth it out? The hole was about 3 inches but as I mentioned it has been patched, plastered, primed and painted.

Several ways.. what are some easier ways.. I'm a girl with very little home improvement talent.

 
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09-22-09, 09:18 AM   #5  
Hang a mirror or a picture over it. Be careful not to make another hole you don't want.

Probably the most common mistake people make in a patch is trying to do it with one or two coats of mud. here is what I think will work the best, Sand all of the mud you can off the patch. Then take a look at it; it might look fine, but I doubt it so then use a nice large taping knife or a trowel and put on just as little mud as you can and lay it down really smooth, You can use a little mist of water to lubricate the knife or trowel. Pay special attention to the edges. You want them to be as smooth with the surrounding area as possible. Then let it dry. Do the same thing again only make the area you cover larger to smooth out the first edges. What you are after is a patch that is large enough to give the illusion of flatness with the wall. Then let this dry and sand all of it. Sand especially around the edges to make them blend with the existing area. Then wipe off the dust, look it over one more time for perfection then touch up as needed, sand prime and paint and hope for the best. Be prepared to prime and paint the whole wall and hope you don't have to.

 
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09-22-09, 09:42 AM   #6  
The TV is over the hole but it still bothers her. If it gets any worse, she might have to move.

 
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09-22-09, 09:45 AM   #7  
Can I use a dry wall screen to sand the uneven spots of what is there or am I just going to make it look worse?

Please keep in mind this behind a large tv that is already mounted to the wall.

My husband is fine w/ the wall as is abd he's not agreeable to taking the tv down and properly repairing the wall and repainting. That will never happen.

My goal at this point is to make that spot a little more visually appearing because I can see it and look for it every time I enter the room. It's likely no one else will.

So basically I am looking for some tips on how to clean up my work, if possible, even just a little bit.

More compound? A screen sander?

Thanks so much guys.

 
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09-22-09, 10:20 AM   #8  
A piece of sand paper is all you need to sand it but you won't be able to do much if the TV is there.

 
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09-22-09, 10:24 AM   #9  
the tv is not flush to the wall so I can get to the spot. You can see the area if you are looking at the wall from the side. The sand paper doesn't seem to get through the paint. Is there a certain grade paper you recommend?

 
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09-22-09, 10:34 AM   #10  
You don't have enough pressure from the side. That's why you're having problems. There are sanding blocks available. Your local hardware store should have them but you may have the same problem.

 
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09-22-09, 10:41 AM   #11  
That makes sense. I'll purchase a sanding block. Any recommendation on grade of sandpaper? After I sand.. do I apply more compound at that point or just prime and paint?

 
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09-22-09, 11:19 AM   #12  
It sounds like you need a course sanding block. I'm talking about the type that doesn't need sand paper. You sand with the block itself. After you sand, run your hand over the spot. If it feels smooth enough to your liking, then paint it. Don't add more compound.

 
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09-22-09, 01:24 PM   #13  
Latex paint doesn't sand well - it likes to gum up the paper IMO the best sanding option is to use a coarse grit paper to remove the bulk and then apply a thin coat of joint compound to fill the sanding scratches.

I don't know how effective a sanding sponge will be a cutting thru the paint and into the j/c but it will work fine for finish sanding a new coat of j/c.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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09-22-09, 01:49 PM   #14  
It sure bothers me to think about sanding in that close proximity to the TV.

I suppose in theory solid state circuitry could work just fine in a sawmill but I don't like the idea.

 
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