gap left in drywall after molding removed

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  #1  
Old 12-15-09, 07:40 AM
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Question gap left in drywall after molding removed

I just bought a one-story ranch home. One of the previous owners went a little crazy with the molding. There is very nice crown molding in the living/family rooms, kitchen and hallway. But the crown and baseboard molding in the bedrooms is cheaper, plainer, and does not come close to matching. In addition to that, they even put cheap thin molding in the corners of the bedrooms from floor to ceiling!

I would very much like to remove all of the corner molding, and would even like to remove the plain crown molding for replacement somewhere in the future with one that matches the rest of the house.

I tested by removing a strip of the cheap corner molding in one of the closets. That's right, it's even in the closets. It came off easily enough, but there is a gap of about 1/8-1/4 inch left between the two pieces of drywall that make the corner of the closet.

So my question(s) is/are this: what should I do about that gap? Is there an easy way to fill it?

Also, since I am left with this small gap after removing the corner molding, do I even want to touch the crown and baseboard molding in the bedrooms, or am I better off just leaving that alone for now?

I have not tried removing any of the corner molding in the main part of the rooms, so it may be that there is no gap there.

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 12-15-09, 07:58 AM
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If your walls and ceiling are smooth it should be pretty easy to fix the gap using tape and mud (either sheetrock mud or setting type compound). The bad part is you will have to repaint. I suggest taking it room by room as much as you can so not to get overwhelmed.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 08:04 AM
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Thanks for the help, Tolyn! The good news is that all painting in these rooms has yet to be done I am trying to get them all fully prepped (one roome at a time) before I start painting, so I wanted to look at this molding issue first. I will start looking at more specific instructions now for drywall taping and mudding.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 09:26 AM
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Welcome to the forums Emily!

It sounds like the previous owners may have put up new drywall and didn't know how to finish the angles. It's not all that difficult. Large gaps should be prefilled and the joint compound allowed to dry, otherwise you fold the paper drywall tape [it has a crease], apply joint compound to both sides of the wall [a little wider than the tape] press the tape in place and then smooth out both sides with a drywall knife. Generally you'll need to apply 2 more coats of j/c, letting it dry between coats and sanding the final coat of mud.

Is there texture on the ceilings? If there is, it will need to be retextured after the taping is finished...... something to consider before removing the crown molding.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 10:06 AM
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Thanks, Mark! Good call asking me about the ceiling texture. Hadn't put two and two together yet on that one. They are 'extreme' popcorn ceilings. In the long run, I want to remove them, so I will wait until that stage before I bother with removing the crown molding. Of course, the overly-ambitious side of me wants to do all of this before I move in at the end of January, but I'm trying to remain realistic.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 12-15-09, 11:03 AM
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Texture can be easy to remove, or very difficult, depending of it has been painted. Either way it will be very messy. It is not an impossible task though and is done all the time and mud is cheap. A couple of skim coats and it will be good to go. When you remove the molding would be a perfect time to remove the texture as well. remember, room by room.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 11:40 AM
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Cool. I was reading last night on how to remove the texture. Good to have it reiterated that it is fairly easy. Mine has Never been painted, but that popcorn texture up there is really thick, like a rounded mountain range, so I'm sure it will make a huge mess. I also will not touch it before having it tested for asbestos.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 02:34 PM
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When was your house built? Asbestos texture was banned in the late 70's but stock was allowed to be used up. Anything done after '81-'82 should be asbestos free.
 
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Old 12-15-09, 05:02 PM
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1971. thanks for the thought, though. I am keeping my fingers crossed that it is asbestos free.
 
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