Kitchen Ceiling

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  #1  
Old 01-05-10, 06:29 AM
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Kitchen Ceiling

I hope this is correct forum for this question. I am making plans for a complete kitchen update. It is long past due. I have what I believe is called a textured or "popcorn" type ceiling surface throughout my home-circa late 60s. I hate this surface. I would prefer a smooth surface ceiling. Can this be done and what is the procedure/options to accomplish this?

Thank you for reading and all replies/advice.

TD
 
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Old 01-05-10, 09:04 AM
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The first thing you want to do is get the texture tested for asbestos!

Removing popcorn texture is more messy than difficult. Basically you mist it with water and scrape it off. If the ceiling has been painted it will take a little more work. Painted texture should be scraped first which will expose unpainted texture, then wet and scrape again.

After all the texture is removed and any residue wiped off with a damp rag/sponge, you will need to skim coat the ceiling with joint compound. This will both cover up any damage from popcorn removal and fix any finishing defects hid by the popcorn.

If the popcorn has asbestos, the procedure is basically the same except you want to contain ALL the debris. Asbestos isn't harmful while wet, it's when it's in dry dust [breathable] form that it's hazardous to your health.
 
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Old 01-05-10, 12:22 PM
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I've taken off popcorn texture before. I used a cheap garden sprayer with hot water to soften the texture first. Lowe's sells a texture remover which looks like a drywall knife, but has a bracket on it to hold a small garbage bag. It worked great for me. You need an extension handle unless you like scraped knuckles. If you work carefully, you won't damage much of the ceiling, but you probably will have to skim coat parts of it.
 
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Old 01-05-10, 12:40 PM
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That texture remover sounds like a great idea, seems like it would contain most if not all of the mess in what is normally a very messy project.
 
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Old 01-07-10, 06:45 AM
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I do appreciate the replies. I had a contractor in yesterday and we discussed the ceiling. I just listened but he wanted to sheetrock over the pebble surface which I do not want. my contractor and I will sit down and talk about this further.

Thanks again.
 
  #6  
Old 01-07-10, 12:01 PM
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Sheeting over that popcorn ceiling is going to lose you space.
You may not notice but the loss of space will be there.

The contractor most likely is looking to save time and money (although probably not passing that little bit of savings on to you). If the ceiling is old and looks bad taking the whole thing down and re sheeting isn't a bad idea. Consider how much more lighting you will want to add (recessed lighting, maybe a fan, maybe a large fixture over the cooking area). It may be best just to spend the extra money and do a complete take down. In the grand scheme of things it's not a whole bunch more considering and assuming you will be doing the whole kitchen. In addition, if you hire the electrician to install additional fixtures, his price will be cheaper if he can get at the exposed ceiling, further reducing constraints on your budget. Do the demo, and then call in the electrician before re-sheeting.

Just as an example, I recently redid my Kitchen. I did mostly everything (cabinets, floor, appliances, and lighting), but I don't do drywall. It would've taken me way to long with less than exceptional results. (ceiling and two walls I halved). I hired a dry wall contractor to do so and got a considerable reduction in cost by doing the demo (or take down) myself.
 
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Old 01-07-10, 12:02 PM
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kitchen ceiling

If you have enough ceiling height, the sheetrock would be an easier solution, but most kitchens don't have extra height there.
 
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Old 01-07-10, 02:31 PM
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Some locales are stricter than others on asbestos removal and disposal so it may be the contractor doesn't want to deal with those issues. Might be more expensive too

While I'm not fond of laminating over the popcorn, it isn't unheard of and is an acceptable method providing the screws are long enough to secure the drywall to the joists/rafters. Tear out isn't always a great option - it's messy and if there is attic space above with blown in insulation.... well you know where that insulation would wind up

IMO the living space lost is negligible.
 
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Old 01-15-10, 07:25 AM
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marksr

I do appreciate the replies. I do not want to lose any ceiling height and would prefer that the textured surface just be removed and ceiling be smooth. Does it matter whether my existing is plaster or sheetrock? I do intend to update my lighting with recessed fixtures. Like everyone I want to keep my costs under control but doing this correctly is very important.

I appreciate the mention of asbestos but I doubt that this is an issue.

Thanks for reading and all replies.

TD
 
  #10  
Old 01-15-10, 02:51 PM
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Usually popcorn is applied to drywall to hide a poor [or incomplete] finish job. Plaster by it's nature is usually finished better with no need for a heavy texture like popcorn although sometimes in remodel work, plaster will have the cracks filled and texture added to hide that fact.

It shouldn't make any difference with removal whether it's drywall or plaster. Getting the texture wet and scraping it off is the way to remove the popcorn.

You would want to involve the electrician before you completely finish the ceiling in case they need more access to run the wires and can lights.

Any special reason you doubt asbestos is an issue? Breathing asbestos dust can cause serious health problems even though they wouldn't be immediately realized
 
  #11  
Old 01-17-10, 06:35 AM
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marksr

I do appreciate your replies and expert advice. Based on my location(southeast) and age of home(late 60s), I did not believe this ceiling was asbestos contaminated. On Friday, I specifically asked second contractor about this and he said it was not asbestos. While this was just a visual observation, I assume he has experience in this area and is confidant in his assessment. He is a true General Contractor who is well recommended and always has ongoing work in one of our city's oldest and most established neighborhood(1950s and older) and I am certain he knows asbestos from jobs located there.

Thanks again.

TD
 
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