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skim coat plaster ?


Spat's Avatar
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01-19-10, 11:15 PM   #1  
skim coat plaster ?

I have removed tiles from a kitchen back splash that is a plaster wall. Doing so areas of the top coat came off in chunks leaving 1 to 3 inch voids less than 1/8" deep scattered places across the wall. What remains is rock solid
My want is to skim coat 2 side walls then paint and retile the wall the sink is on.
I have a block wall in the garage I have experimented with plaster of paris after lightly dampening the wall looks like it could work. Am I on the right track?
I guess what I am looking for is suggestions on materials and procedure.
I know you all like pictures so see attached.





 
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01-20-10, 04:43 AM   #2  
I generally make plaster repairs with a setting compound like durabond. You could also use regular joint compound [premixed in a bucket] It's a little more user friendly but doesn't dry as hard as durabond. I've never worked with plaster

Hopefully one of our plaster pros will be along shortly to give your more advice


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01-20-10, 05:00 AM   #3  
I would use "Lightweight Joint Setting type Compound" (people around here call it speed set) which sets up like Durabond but you can still sand it smooth. Durabond is HARD.


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01-20-10, 12:51 PM   #4  
I was looking for something a little more durable than joint compound. That's why I kept with a plaster type poduct, I'll look into durabond. Thanks

 
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01-20-10, 02:26 PM   #5  
If you use real Durabond in the brown package make sure you lay it down flat and flush. If it is shy of flush you can always add more after it sets. The Durabond will be tougher, if not harder than that finish plaster and if you try to sand it you will sand more plaster off than Durabond.

The Plaster of Paris you mention is pretty good. Wet the areas you are going to patch a little before you apply the PoP. Likewise lay it down perfectly.
With both of these you can trowel them down almost as smooth as that plaster was when it was new. Wet the work a little to lubricate your trowel and trowel the patches down just as they set. Remember keep it flush, don't let the work get high.

How do you intend to finish this? Is the plaster going to be the finish? Tile? Granite to match?

If plaster you will probably want to skim the whole thing at least twice after you get the oatches filled. I like A setting material like EasySand by USG, there are other brands. They don't get quite as hard as the Durabond otherwise work about the same way.
Skim, let it set, shave off the high points and ridges, skim, let it set, sand, touch up imperfections, sand, prime and paint.

 
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01-20-10, 05:41 PM   #6  
I removed tile from the 3 walls only the sink wall is going to be tiled the side will be painted. I'm glad I have the garage wall to practice with.
Thanks

 
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01-20-10, 06:47 PM   #7  
Another product that is made my the same people as Durabond is Structo-lite. This sets up very fast and hard. It might be hard to find at the big box store but you will find it at drywall supply places. Only used it a little but. Seamed like good stuff for plaster. Also hard to sand.


I was looking for something a little more durable than joint compound.
What are you planing to do with the wall?


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01-20-10, 07:01 PM   #8  
If you are going to cover it up StructoLite would work but it will not lay down as slick as the original walls. It is a basecoat material and by the way, it is notoriously slow to set. It would certainly dry out before it set in the application you are doing. Don't get StructoLite. There are ways to get StructoLite to set quickly but that just complicates the matter in your case. I would use Kal-Coat or Diamond myself but for an amateur you are still better off with the Durabond or the EasySand.

 
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01-22-10, 07:28 AM   #9  
Been there done that. Scrape all the old adhesive off using a heat gun if necessary. Then use regular dry wall compound in several layers. Avoid plaster of paris at all costs. It drys too fast and costs too much to buy.

 
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