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sheetrock and ceiling question


mystar's Avatar
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01-30-10, 11:26 AM   #1  
sheetrock and ceiling question

my basement is framed up and i'm putting up sheetrock , my ceiling is 2x4's laying flat running the span off the ceiling and instead of being on 16 centers they are on 24's is that gonna be a problem with that big of a gap on the ceiling when screwing the sheetrock up , just wondering about the holding power.

 
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01-30-10, 11:53 AM   #2  
The only recommendation I would have is that 5/8" thick sheetrock is usually recommended for ceilings when 24" OC. It resists sagging a little better.

IMO the strongest pattern for screwing a ceiling is 6 screws per joist, one on each end, and a pair at 14 and 18" and a pair at 30 and 34". But the sagging between joists is due to the weight of the sheetrock itself, not the way it is screwed. They do make a sag resistant 1/2" sheetrock, but it might not be readily available in your area. You might be fine using regular 1/2" since you won't have blow in insulation on top of it, but high moisture, as in a basement, can also increase the likelihood of 1/2" drywall sagging. So that's why 5/8" is a safe bet. 5/8" could also be mandatory, depending on your fire code.

 
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01-31-10, 08:22 AM   #3  
As Xsleeper suggested 5/8 is better. However it costs more is very heavy and may not be available in longer lengths. My suggestion would be to lay additional 2x4's or 2x3's and make the distance less. The cost will be minimal in the total cost of the job and in the end will make things easier.

 
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01-31-10, 09:44 AM   #4  
Posted By: mystar my basement is framed up and i'm putting up sheetrock , my ceiling is 2x4's laying flat running the span off the ceiling and instead of being on 16 centers they are on 24's is that gonna be a problem with that big of a gap on the ceiling when screwing the sheetrock up , just wondering about the holding power.
2x4's especially running flat are going to sag no matter what you do, reframe it properly, then use hat channel or furring strips on the bottom of the joists, you can use 1/2" ceiling boards.

 
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01-31-10, 09:58 AM   #5  
I don't think he has 2X4 joists I think he has 2x4 furring. They won't sag if placed on the side any more then any furring would sag.

 
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01-31-10, 10:04 AM   #6  
Posted By: mgmine I don't think he has 2X4 joists I think he has 2x4 furring. They won't sag if placed on the side any more then any furring would sag.
If he has 2x4's for furring, he can use 1/2" ceiling boards.

 
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01-31-10, 10:11 AM   #7  
Posted By: XSleeper The only recommendation I would have is that 5/8" thick sheetrock is usually recommended for ceilings when 24" OC. It resists sagging a little better.

IMO the strongest pattern for screwing a ceiling is 6 screws per joist, one on each end, and a pair at 14 and 18" and a pair at 30 and 34". But the sagging between joists is due to the weight of the sheetrock itself, not the way it is screwed. They do make a sag resistant 1/2" sheetrock, but it might not be readily available in your area. You might be fine using regular 1/2" since you won't have blow in insulation on top of it, but high moisture, as in a basement, can also increase the likelihood of 1/2" drywall sagging. So that's why 5/8" is a safe bet. 5/8" could also be mandatory, depending on your fire code.
If you don't use 1/2" ceiling boards, you will need to use 5/8" or it will sag.

 
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01-31-10, 10:21 AM   #8  
what does furring mean? , it looks like small rafters coming down from the upper level of the house and the rafters and these 2x4s are connected at different points throughout with metal brackets all 3 pieces come together and are connect with these metal pieces

 
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01-31-10, 10:23 AM   #9  
Use 5/8" rock. It will cost a little more but only $50-100 for the whole job. Getting 12' sheets should not be an issue.


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01-31-10, 10:32 AM   #10  
Posted By: mystar what does furring mean? , it looks like small rafters coming down from the upper level of the house and the rafters and these 2x4s are connected at different points throughout with metal brackets all 3 pieces come together and are connect with these metal pieces
That sounds like a truss.

Furring would be attached to the bottom cord of the truss.

If they are floor trusses, they should be 12" O.C.

Can you post a picture?

 
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01-31-10, 10:46 AM   #11  
Posted By: Tolyn Ironhand Use 5/8" rock. It will cost a little more but only $50-100 for the whole job. Getting 12' sheets should not be an issue.
1/2" ceiling boards are more rigid than 5/8" and the boards are lighter, making it easier to install.

Ceiling boards are available in 10', 12' and 14' lengths.

 
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01-31-10, 10:59 AM   #12  
the small truss come from the bottom of the floor from the upper level of the house there about 18 inches or so tall they are shaped like a V the point of the V is on the bottom meeting the 2x4 i;m talking about and all the points are connected together with metal brackets

 
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01-31-10, 12:24 PM   #13  
Then you do indeed have 24" centers and will either need to use the 5/8" as suggested or install furring strips and attach the ceiling to these. Furring strips are usually 1x3 that run the other direction from the floor joists.

 
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01-31-10, 12:34 PM   #14  
Posted By: mgmine Then you do indeed have 24" centers and will either need to use the 5/8" as suggested or install furring strips and attach the ceiling to these. Furring strips are usually 1x3 that run the other direction from the floor joists.
1/2" ceiling boards is what I would use.

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01-31-10, 02:04 PM   #15  
so ya'll do understand what i'm talking about then ? cool thats what il\'ll look into and with h1/2 boards what size screw would you use on the ceiling, with 1/2 on the walls at home depot they told me to use 1 1/4 screws is that right for the walls

 
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01-31-10, 05:53 PM   #16  
Posted By: mystar so ya'll do understand what i'm talking about then ? cool thats what il\'ll look into and with h1/2 boards what size screw would you use on the ceiling, with 1/2 on the walls at home depot they told me to use 1 1/4 screws is that right for the walls
If you do use 1/2" for the ceiling, make sure they are ceiling boards, it will say 'ceiling' on the face side of the boards, so you will know they are ceiling boards, Home Depot or other home center most likely will not have them.

1 1/4" screws will be fine, just don't overdrive them, if you do, put a screw on each side.

Apparently I offended some people here so this will be the last of my professional advice here.

 
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02-01-10, 07:39 AM   #17  
Okay to clear things up, you can use ceiling drywall such as ToughRock CD because it is meant to withstand sagging on 24" centers. The problem is trying to find it. You can also use 5/8" but it's heavy to work with and cost more then 1/2". The third option is you can use furring spaced 16" centers and use 1/2" drywall. I have never found 1/2" to sag when used on 16" centers but then again I haven't put more than a few hundred sheets up on ceilings. I've used 5/8 for code reasons and ToughRock for spec reasons.

 
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