Matching Texture

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  #1  
Old 02-07-10, 02:19 PM
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Matching Texture

We just re-did our kitchen. Moved some cabinets and added a dishwasher. Also, the ceiling in the old kitchen was dropped down in the entire kitchen area, not just over the upper cabinets as is traditional. We tore out this drop down, which was drywalled, and the ceiling is now the same height as the rest of the house.

The problem is one full side of the new ceiling is (about 10 ft) is up against the old cieling without anything bordering it (the other sides are up against a wall). The old cieling is textured. It appears it was done with what I call a 'stomping' brush (large oval heavy bristled brush). I've seen many cielings done with these brushes and they all look a little different. The only one I was involved with didn't end up looking anything like mine currently looks.

Any suggestions on how to texture to match? What are the normal techniques using a stomping brush? What type of compound do I use? Do I apply it to the cieling first or dip the brush in it? Is there a good way to practice? Online videos? Etc. etc. etc.

Or do I throw in the towl and put a nice piece of trim along this edge and either leave the kitchen smooth or give it a completely different texture?
 
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  #2  
Old 02-07-10, 03:41 PM
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Well since you're inviting outside opinions then I suggest that you use the trim piece method and call it a day. If you were very experienced in applying texture it wouldn't be an issue. But if you doubt your ability then take advantage of your good sense and avoid possibly keeping your kitchen that you've already worked toward improving a construction zone just with this simple aspect of your project. If you become proficient with texturing later or the appearance doesn't satisfy you, you can always "pick the towel back up" later on.

$0.02
 
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Old 02-08-10, 04:06 AM
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If I understand correctly, you re drywalled the entire kitchen ceiling but the ceiling flows into the next room with no natural break. If the proposed trim is to be installed on the ceiling, IMO that would look tacky

When applying stomp texture, I prefer to thin down the joint compound and roll it unto the ceiling and then stomp the texture. There are some that will dunk the texture brush into the j/c and then apply the mud to the ceiling. Use the regular j/c that comes in 5 gallon buckets.

The thicker the j/c is, the heavier the texture will be. You could practice matching the texture next to the other room, if it doesn't look to be close, scrape it off [while still wet] and modify your mud.
 
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Old 02-08-10, 05:10 PM
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Thanks for the advice - The assumption was correct that the ceiling now flows into the rest of the house with no height difference.

I actually found a video online last night of someone stomping a ceiling. They tool were using what looked like watered down j/c, rolling it on and then stomping.

My plan now is, as was suggested, to match the texture using trial and error method. Once done, I'm going to be painting all of the textured ceilings, old and new and by giving it an even color hopefully this will help hide any minor differences.

One more quesion - what's a good starting point for water to j/c mix?
 
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Old 02-09-10, 03:54 AM
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I don't really know how much water I add to the j/c I kind of eyeball it until it looks right

For a real light texture you thin the j/c until it's a little thicker than paint although the majority of stomp ceilings are thicker than that. Of course it's better to start out too thick than too thin - it's easier to add more water than to take it away

Sorry I couldn't provide the answer you are looking for
hopefully someone else will reply with better info for you
 
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