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ceiling separated


peterr's Avatar
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03-04-10, 01:02 PM   #1  
ceiling separated

I hope this link takes you to a picture of my ceiling.



It is about 14" long and 1/4" wide and seems to be sagging or below level. It was there when we moved here 6 yearsago and was built 25 years ago so I think it is settled.
Should I cut back(not knowing what is in these townhouses) and replace a piece, or use some fiberglass tape and mud and try to fill and build?
Thank you

 
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marksr's Avatar
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03-04-10, 02:15 PM   #2  
Can you tell if the drywall is securely fastened to the framing? Does it move any if you apply pressure?

I can't tell if the crack includes the tape or is just the mud over it. If the tape is flat [no bubbles] you can scrape off some of the joint compound and remud, otherwise you'll need to cut out the affected section of tape and redo.

Sticky tape [fiberglass] has a poor track record - it doesn't always stay firmly adhered - paper tape will do a better job.


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03-04-10, 04:45 PM   #3  
What is above this area?

To me, it looks like there are other paint cracks in the area, indicitive of moisture from above.

And that crack looks abnormal compared to the usual sheetrock joint and/or paper tape cracks. it isn't even straight.

It looks the way a crack looks when a heavily repair-filled area looks, like when someone has latex caulked and it splits open. Or maybe a heavy spacklle coat by ex owner to cover it up.

How far away from that wall is that crack? From the looks of it, it looks too close for someone to have put a drywall seam there.

IS it drywall, or is it plaster?

See if a nail can go into solid wood, in that crack - or not.

 
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03-05-10, 05:57 AM   #4  
I agree. Looks to be an old patch comming loose. Also looks like water damage. You should cut out a big piece of the ceiling to see whats going on. By big I mean 16"x16". You say its a townhouse so it could be from an upstairs bathroom or the roof if it's on an exterior wall. Let us know what you find out.

 
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03-05-10, 09:01 AM   #5  
cracked ceiling

I know what you all mean about ," What is above it?"
I do not see any typical moisture marks and we hhave not seen any water, but I guess I will have to poke around to see what is behind it.
Sometimes they hardly put any wood behind and if I cut, I could really have a big problem.
Only one way to find out and that is to probe.
Let me start that and I'll let you know what I find.
This is harder because it is at the top of a cathedral type ceiling.
Be back when I can get to it and thanx.

P.S. I am editing because I noticed I did not answer your questions.
I have not yet gone up to play with it as it is about 12' high. Above it is the roof.
I do not see water here but it is possible.
Talk soon.

 
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03-05-10, 11:20 AM   #6  
Ok, I think I'm getting it. Is this a big angle to a vaulted ceiling? It looks in the picture to be on a flat ceiling and about 2 feet long. That picture is totally confusing. Also it looks like in the picture that there is a dark ring around the crack indicating a water stain. Maybe it's just a shadow? Anyway, get up there and scrape off the loose stuff. If the tape is loose then cut it back to the angle. Fill in what came out with mud. Then caulk the angle. Should be pretty easy.

 
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03-05-10, 12:00 PM   #7  
cracked ceiling

Posted By: coops28 Ok, I think I'm getting it. Is this a big angle to a vaulted ceiling? It looks in the picture to be on a flat ceiling and about 2 feet long. That picture is totally confusing. Also it looks like in the picture that there is a dark ring around the crack indicating a water stain. Maybe it's just a shadow? Anyway, get up there and scrape off the loose stuff. If the tape is loose then cut it back to the angle. Fill in what came out with mud. Then caulk the angle. Should be pretty easy.
>>Sorry about the misleading picture.
Yes, the dark surface is the wall and the lighter surface the ceiling. As you point out, the ceiling is really slanted.
I agree it should be straight forward but needed some pro opinion 1st.
Age + health slow you down when you hit a 'snag' so I was being careful before I dug in.
If it is not bulging past surface, I will tape + mud. If it is bulging, I will have to tap away until I am flush, then go from there.
You prefer the ez sand 5 instaed of mud?

 
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03-06-10, 03:47 PM   #8  
ceiling separated

I got a surprise because when I cut a section away, it was not an old repair job after all.
The manufactured truss above the ceiling had warped and one of the joists had pushed down on the sheet rock where it meets the wall.
I need to ask a question.
I placed a 12" x 16" piece of what I assume is 1/2" sheetrock on the ceiling and drew a pencil line to know where to cut.
When I made the hole and removed the warped piece of wood, I put a couple of pieces of plywood straps about 3" x 16" inside the cutout to support the new sheet rock.
I then screwed it all together.
Problem is that the new sheetrock seems too thin as it is not even with the old sheet shock. It seems like it is about 1/8" too thin. The patch is flush with the ceiling as it should be.
Should I be looking for a thicker piece of sheetrock or should I try to even it out with mud.
It appears hard to 'tape' and mud over the uneven surfaces.
Thank you

 
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03-06-10, 04:34 PM   #9  
A lot of ceilings are hung with 5/8" drywall - that may be what you have. You can either replace it with 5/8 or build it up with mud. If you build it up, it's best to use a setting compound [durabond, easy sand]


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03-07-10, 05:15 AM   #10  
ceiling separation

Posted By: marksr A lot of ceilings are hung with 5/8" drywall - that may be what you have. You can either replace it with 5/8 or build it up with mud. If you build it up, it's best to use a setting compound [durabond, easy sand]
>>I thought I heard that sheetrock is actually sold by eights;
2/8 =1/4" , 3/8 = 3/8", 4/8 = 1/2", 5/8 = 5/8", 6/8 = 3/4".
So you are right and I need to get the same size piece.
My neighbor could get a piece for me which would be easier for a clunker like me.
Thanx for the advice.

 
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03-07-10, 05:27 AM   #11  
I'm familiar with 1/4",3/8",1/2" and 5/8". Never seen any 3/4" but I'm sure I wouldn't want any part in hanging it


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03-07-10, 12:36 PM   #12  
ceiling

Posted By: marksr I'm familiar with 1/4",3/8",1/2" and 5/8". Never seen any 3/4" but I'm sure I wouldn't want any part in hanging it
>> I understand about the 3/4; I think I read about it but could be wrong. I had to hang firewall once in Massachusetts and I know it was heavy.
Anyway, the boy next door who does drywall is bringing over a piece of 5/8 tomorrow nite so it will be smoother than the 1/2".
It sure would help if a lot of things were standardized unless there is a fuctional reason for being different.

 
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03-07-10, 02:40 PM   #13  
Generally walls are 1/2" and ceilings 5/8" since 5/8" costs a tad more and a lot more labor for hanging, many builders will cheat and use 1/2" on the ceiling. 5/8" is also required by code anywhere you have to have a firewall - like between apartments or from garage to living area.

1/4" is mostly used for curved walls as it will bend fairly easy. Doubled up it matches the 1/2" straight walls.

3/8" isn't used a whole lot, mostly cheap remodels although the older I get the more I think I like the lighter weight of the 3/8


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03-08-10, 06:09 AM   #14  
ceiling

I think the 5/8" will work fine tonight but because he does this for a living, I'll let him at least exchange the patched piece so nothing is sticking out -that would be worse than if something is indented.
If a corner did stick out a bit I gues you could always cut it back with a sharp knife and fill with mud.
I guess I better get some paint for the ceiling.
Can I just get some flat ceiling paint and skip the primer except for the place where I mud which will need a primer?

 
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03-08-10, 06:19 AM   #15  
Only the repairs should need priming. Do you have leftover ceiling paint or know what brand/line of paint was used on the ceiling?.... or do you intend to repaint the entire ceiling? Not all white paints are the same shade of white. Depending on the age of the ceiling paint, it might not touch up even if you have the correct paint - but a lot depends on how picky you are

While I don't recommend skipping the primer, the ceiling is one place you could fudge if need be [as long as it isn't a kitchen or bath ceiling]


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03-08-10, 12:01 PM   #16  
ceiling

I don't have any white paint so I guess I can just ask the person at Home Depot for a ceiling paint.
I think it shoud be flat.
I am too old to worry about the fine hairs but I do undrstand about moisture and kitchens and baths.
This is dry and not a problem.
I'l prime the patch then paint the ceiling with a standard ceiling paint. I know there will be a minor difference where the primer is but I won't look too hard.

 
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