Taping troubles

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  #1  
Old 06-15-10, 11:57 AM
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Taping troubles

Drywall n00b here.

Installed new drywall in a bathroom I'm remodeling, all went well until I started taping last night, so a couple of questions for the experts.

First off, I'm using 90-minute hot mud for taping - mistake?

Taped three joints last night (all tapered seams). First two I think I didn't embed the tape enough - just looks "chunky", and the corner is actually lifting in the end of one seam.

So, questions:

Should I be using hot mud for taping?
What do I do about the corner that's lifting up?
Is it possible to start over easily, and if so, what are the necessary steps?

I should add that the mud in all the seams is still in the taper - I can run a 10-inch knife over the seam and not hit any mud.

Thanks in advance,
 
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  #2  
Old 06-15-10, 01:56 PM
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You can tape with either regular joint compound or a setting compound.

Any tape that isn't bonded to the drywall needs to have mud inserted under the tape. You might be able to lift the tape and mud it that way or might mean taking the tape off and starting over.
 
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Old 06-15-10, 03:56 PM
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I'm guessing you mixed the mud up too stiff. It has to be thinned with water so that it's about the consistency of pudding. Then you'll be able to wipe the paper down tighter with your knife. I always use straight joint compound behind tape, but either would work. It dries quickly when the mud has been thinned and the tape has been scraped down tight.

I hope your 90 minute mud is in the blue and white "easy sand" bag.
 
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Old 06-15-10, 04:10 PM
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Thanks marksr and XSleeper,

It looks like I only have a problem in one corner and I should be able to fix it easily enough, but I'm switching to all-purpose mud.

XSleeper, I don't need to worry about sanding, all I've done so far is the taping, I'll be using all-purpose for subsequent coats.
 
  #5  
Old 06-15-10, 06:20 PM
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OK, now that I'm home and have taken another look, I really screwed up. The tape and mud are already higher than the taper depth. I pulled the tape off, but now I need to get the hot mud out and start over.

What's the best/easiest way to do this?
 
  #6  
Old 06-15-10, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by greg98 View Post
I don't need to worry about sanding, all I've done so far is the taping, I'll be using all-purpose for subsequent coats.
Sounds like you've been trying to get it perfect without relying on being able to sand. Which is the goal, but if you have to overwork any compound to do so it'll give you unsatifactory results. It loses water right when it hits the wall. So if you scrape and reapply it won't cooperate.

Kudos for tackling a new skill.
 
  #7  
Old 06-16-10, 04:27 AM
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removing the excess hot mud

Setting compounds are hard to sand but they can be sanded. I'd scrape what you can and then sand the rest.
 
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Old 06-16-10, 05:27 AM
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For a DIYer I suggest avoiding using setting type compound for anything other then prefilling gaps in sheetrock. It can be tough to get a smooth consistency of mud. I like to use plus 3 in the blue bucket for all coats.
 
  #9  
Old 06-16-10, 08:15 AM
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Thanks marksr and Tolyn. It's definitely pre-mixed for me from now on.

Breaking out the power sander and respirator tonight, wish me luck.
 
  #10  
Old 06-17-10, 03:20 AM
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Be careful with the power sander, you don't want to sand into the drywall and create a new set of problems
 
  #11  
Old 06-17-10, 08:29 AM
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NOW you tell me!

Just kidding - I ended up scraping it down using my 10-inch and 3-inch knives, turned out pretty good. Got down to the paper, minimal damage to the drywall (nicked the paper in a couple of spots).

Now I'll "retire" the hot mud and try again - this time it's all-purpose for this n00b.

Thanks again for all the help and advice.
 
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