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Filler...


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08-31-10, 05:41 AM   #1  
Filler...

Hi! Allthough its a bit late (I kinda made that repair almost) I wanted to ask a question about patching very deep holes.
I recently opened up a huge vertical hole in a wall in order to expose the water drain and now I am closing it again.
I am using some mix-in-place plaster to fill it but I allready spent 2 * 5kg bags filling it and it needs at least one more
At some point I used some broken tiles to bring the surface a bit forward so I wont need to fill the hole too deep (there is also the mid-wall gap there and the outer bricks were missing at some point.)
Do you know any materials that I could use inside the plaster in order to make the volume bigger and fill the hole with less plaster?
Many thanks

 
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08-31-10, 09:44 AM   #2  
How deep is the hole?

I'm not much on repairing plaster but what I would have done is install some framing or something to screw to, and installed a piece of drywall just shy of flush - to fill the hole. Then I'd use a setting compound like durabond to bring the repair flush.


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08-31-10, 12:59 PM   #3  
The hole is about 2cm deep and at some points the second layer of bricks is missing, exposing the gap between the two layers of bricks. I put some tiles there and was going to cover with the plaster.
I cant get a piece of drywall like that unless I go to a drywall shop and I dont know one around
I was thinking of "mixing" the plaster with some tile pieces or maybe just put some more tiles before I put the plaster to provide a filler, but I cant make the tiles stick together so they move about when I put the plaster.

 
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08-31-10, 01:31 PM   #4  
I'm pretty much lost when it comes to the metric system

You'll probably have to 'mortar' the tiles in 1 at a time to get them to stick.


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08-31-10, 01:51 PM   #5  
2.54 cm to an inch, so we're talking something approaching 1" in depth, though I don't know how big the 'gap between the two layers of bricks' is

Can plaster or setting compound be applied to cover something that deep?

 
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08-31-10, 01:59 PM   #6  
I'd prefer not to but it can be applied that thick.


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08-31-10, 06:52 PM   #7  
Posted By: mitch17 2.54 cm to an inch, so we're talking something approaching 1" in depth, though I don't know how big the 'gap between the two layers of bricks' is

Can plaster or setting compound be applied to cover something that deep?
I allready did half of it with no problems, the plaster cracked after drying at some points but I got another type of plaster that I will use over it afterwards (a ready mix one that doesnt crack for some reason but only reduces in volume ). I am basically repairing the wall and preparing it for painting.
There are two layers of bricks on the wall, the outer one is missing across the length of the water drain. The water drain supports the plaster but there are also some bricks missing next to the water drain leaving a huge unfillable hole . I putted some tiles there to support the plaster but I didnt mortar them together, I might try to do that before applying the plaster.
Since I allready did half of it without adding filling in the plaster I will probably just use another bag (hopefully just one) to cover it...

 
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08-31-10, 06:59 PM   #8  
Sounds like what you did will work. Not many box store in Greece.........

Gary

 
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09-01-10, 12:27 PM   #9  
Posted By: GBR in WA Sounds like what you did will work. Not many box store in Greece.........

Gary
Its working but it eats all the plaster There is one big shop here with stuff like that but its out of town...

 
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09-01-10, 12:46 PM   #10  
Yeah, I can believe this is taking a lot of plaster to fill

As Mark said, given the availability of materials, we would never fill this with plaster alone

 
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09-01-10, 04:56 PM   #11  
Are there lower grade plasters used for scratch coats? Seems like when I cut a hole in my wall, there was a gray layer first and then the white finish layer. I would assume the gray layer is less expensive.

 
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09-01-10, 09:50 PM   #12  
by now the job is probably finished. If you had used Portland Cement it would have filled it. Gypsum plaster would have done it quicker for it can be built out more than Portland cement plaster. If you have plain gypsum plaster it can be mixed with sand. There are several kinds of plaster all made with gypsum. Some would set so quickly if you added sand that you might not get it used up before it got hard. Some plaster already has lightweight aggregate (perlite) in it. Since what you are doing is working just keep trying. Where you have a deep void it works to stuff a lot of newspaper into the hole to plug it up then plaster. Sounds a little funny but it has been done thousands of times.

 
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09-02-10, 08:42 AM   #13  
Thats the stuff I used:

This is advertised as plaster, but it contains portland cement and it says in the website that is cement based. It costs about 5euro per 5kg bag. I did most of the filling with that and hmmm no, its still not finished I did use some tiles where the hole was too deep but now the hole is just 2cm deep so I cant use newspaper or tiles.

http://www.isomat.gr/en/premixed-pla...shop.flypage5/

After that I will be using this to make it flat:
This is a bit more expensive but I will only use it for flattening the surface.

...::: ???????? - ?? ???????? ??? :::...

 
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09-02-10, 02:59 PM   #14  
Time was I could read a little koine. I can almost read this but not quite.

I think it will work just fine.

keep the edges of the existing work clean. If it takes multiple coats fine. Just don't build onto the existing work. When you are finished it should be exactly even with the original plaster.

There is only one possible problem I see and it might not be a problem.

If the original plaster is gypsum, Portland cement does not bond well to gypsum. If you had used a bonding agent it might have helped.

If the original plaster is Portland cement plaster you should get a bond and everything should fit just fine when it is finished.

One of the beauties of patching plaster with plaster of the appropriate kind is that it always fits when it is finished; it is neither too high or too low, it ends up flush if you do it right.

 
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09-02-10, 04:58 PM   #15  
I have no idea what the original plaster is... At the point where I was putting the portland cement containing product there wasnt any plaster at all except the edges. There was only the water drain and that is plastic.
Anyway its covered now... The only problem is that at some points it cracked whilst drying, but I will cover it with the other plaster. I will probably apply some primer prior to putting the other plaster.

 
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