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Skim Coating wall After removing wallpaper

Skim Coating wall After removing wallpaper

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  #1  
Old 11-09-10, 10:42 AM
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Skim Coating wall After removing wallpaper

I am about to try to skim coat for the first time after wallpaper removal 240sf.. i have cleaned as much glue off as i can and will coat with Gardz to seal. For a first timer is it best to use light weight compound that come pre mixed or the regular compound. i have seen a video of some one using a paint roller to aply and then smoothing with a troll. Is this really an option. I plan to take my time but would like a good job. By the way the walls are plaster ,can you still use joint compound
 
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  #2  
Old 11-09-10, 10:49 AM
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Yep, joint compound is fine over plaster

I buy the regular stuff in the premixed bucket and slop it on with a drywall knife

Can't see that a paint roller would get much on the wall, but it's certainly possible my problem is ignorance
 
  #3  
Old 11-09-10, 12:45 PM
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I've known those that would roll on thinned j/c and then go over it with a wide knife removing the majority of the mud while leaving some in the minor defects.

The regular j/c has a little more adhesion than the light weight mud so I would lean towards it although either one will work. It's best to thin the j/c slightly with water - this will make it spread easier. Sand your primer first and you shouldn't need a lot of j/c.
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-10, 04:16 PM
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I'm aware of two ways to skim coat that newbies can do:

1. Use a "V" notched adhesive trowel to apply a relatively uniform amount of mud to an area, and then mist the wet mud with a spray bottle and trowel the mud down flat. Allow to dry, sand smooth, prime and paint.

2. Use a "V" notched adhesive trowel to apply a relatively uniform amount of mud to an area, allow to dry, and then fill in the trowel ridges with more mud. Allow to dry, sand smooth, prime and paint.
 
  #5  
Old 11-10-10, 06:10 AM
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I use the all purpose mud for the first coat then lightweight for the rest. I would use a pan and a 10' knife to skim coat. First coat is to cover the bad spots and fill in the voids. Don't worry about small holes in the first coat. Second coat fills in even more and covers the mud that shrank in the first coat. Then the third coat fills in any small holes left over and makes a nice smooth surface. Then sand.

Sorry nestor, I would'nt recommend your way for anyone let alone a beginner. trowels are hard to use and a v notch trowel would put on way too much mud. It would crack like crazy after the second coat.
 
  #6  
Old 11-10-10, 06:37 AM
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I've never heard of Nestor's method either, I use a flat knife as well

The trowel method seems like it would add a very thick layer and I don't think that's the right way to go
 
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