Patching advice


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Old 11-10-10, 03:27 PM
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Patching advice

I manage several units and am looking for some advice on doing a better job patching small holes. Walls are skim coated, and i have been using fast and final patch, then sanding. I am using Benjamin Moore Suoer spec eggshell finish paint. After painting patch is very visable I think mostly from the sanding. I would like perfect the process so it is not visable. All tips greatly appreciated. Most holes are from pictures, and small screw holes from removing curtain rods etc.
 
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Old 11-10-10, 03:59 PM
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Regular joint compound or even spackle would be fine

Could be that the paint is taking differently over the patch, which is why I prime repairs before painting. Could also be you're not leaving the surface with the same texture as the adjacent areas - this would be the case if it is your sanding.

The biggest thing to keep in mind, IMO, is paint usually makes imperfections more visible, not less so. If you can see an imperfection before you prime or paint, you're not ready for priming and painting yet.
 
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Old 11-10-10, 06:12 PM
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Thanks for the reply. I was thinking it could be the sanding. I am using a fine sandpaper. Should I be doing a wet sand or something else to take away the "scruff" marks?
 
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Old 11-11-10, 05:05 AM
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I wouldn't use any sandpaper finer than 180 grit. The primer/paint should fill in most minor sanding scratches.

Eggshell or any wall enamel is harder to touch up than flat wall paint is. As Mitch said, the repair both needs to be sanded level with the surrounding wall and if there is any texture that also needs to be duplicated. Even multiple coats of paint rolled over a slick wall will leave a slight texture.

Orange peel or roller stipple is easy to replicate - just mix some joint compound to about paint consistency and roll it on or dab on with a sponge. It's always a good idea to prime a patch and enamel paint may take 2 coats of finish paint to get it to blend in.
 
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Old 11-11-10, 11:09 AM
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Smallengineguy:

You say these walls are skim coated.

Are they skim coated plaster walls or skim coated drywall walls?
 
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Old 11-16-10, 05:21 PM
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The objective is to only fill the hole. If a person uses a plastic(preferred)putty knife, with spackle, well out beyond the hole size, you will have to do multiple paint coats to hide the spackle mark, which wicks up paint like a sponge. In the light, especially, you will really be able to see the sheen difference. And even then it is hard to blend, as the wall texture or even roller stippling will get somewhat filled in, and not be the same.

It is quicker to use the putty knife method (I can do an entire apt in minutes that way) - grant you that. But if you want less hassle in the painting stage (especially if you are NOT using flat paint, as mentioned by others), only dab the holes with spackle with your finger tip and rub out any excess around the hole. Or simply quickly rub across the filled hole if the hole is tiny. Your finger will conform to the texture, so that when you paint, the fill job wil be quite invisible.

For larger say 3/8ths to 1/2 inch wall anchor holes, then go ahead and use the plastic putty knife to apply spackle with. Then carefully wipe away the excess from around the filled hole.

(I have done thousands and thousands and thousands of square feet of house/apt. wall and ceiling repairs in my line of work/career, so far.)
 
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Old 11-17-10, 06:49 AM
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Nail and other similar holes, I put the mud on generously with a 2" knife and then wipe it clean with a 6" knife - leaves the mud flush with the wall pretty well without getting it all over the place
 
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Old 11-17-10, 09:23 AM
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Mitch, the point he was making is that the mud/spackling you apply with a knife [even if you remove all the excess] will still fill in the texture including roller stipple. Applying mud with just the edge of your thumb works well at filling minor nail holes, other wise you can expect to need a little texture on most any wall other than brand new construction.
 
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Old 11-17-10, 11:52 AM
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Yeah, good point - I never took texture into account, the vast majority of walls I've had to patch have been smooth
 
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Old 11-17-10, 12:15 PM
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For smaller areas..I just clean out the texture around the hole with a damp sponge after filling. Couple of dabs of spackle on the patched hole after it dries normally lets it blend in. Kinda try to duplicate the texture..but as long as its close..it works.
 
 

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