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Matching Drywall Compound shade to existing ceiling

Matching Drywall Compound shade to existing ceiling

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  #1  
Old 11-23-10, 09:33 AM
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Matching Drywall Compound shade to existing ceiling

I've got to make some repairs on a textured unpainted ceiling. I have a mix I used when finishing the basment ceiling with a texture, however it appears to be a bit lighter when I tested it on the ceiling in the garage (which I assume is similar to the rest of the house). I've read you can darken and lighten the shade of the compound by using a different amount of water, but which way is it? Does adding water lighten or darken a mix? Any tips on how to darken the compound a few shades and tips on matching it to an existing ceiling would be appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-23-10, 10:09 AM
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I've never heard of what you mention..but I'm no painting or sheet rocking Pro. I would think after it had dried completely there should be no difference.
 
  #3  
Old 11-23-10, 10:32 AM
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Normally the concern is matching the texture, not the shade

Paint is what does that
 
  #4  
Old 11-23-10, 10:59 AM
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I actually read it on an article posted on this site at Patching a Textured Ceiling: 5 Tips | DoItYourself.com
The comment on changing the shade is at the bottom. It does seem strange but I've seen plenty of things that work when you would normally think it wouldn't so it wouldn't surprise me if it does indeed work.
 
  #5  
Old 11-23-10, 11:03 AM
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Well..like I said..never heard of it. Also..for full disclosure...sometimes the articles in that area can be a little off. We've had it happen in plumbing and electrical as well.

One of our plaster guys may know more about it...I sure don't.
 
  #6  
Old 11-23-10, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
Normally the concern is matching the texture, not the shade

Paint is what does that
Do you mean add paint to the drywall or paint once the repair is done?

If I paint I have to paint virtually the entire upstairs ceiling. It was never painted and has no breaks except for the doorways at the bedroom and the bathrooms. I'd rather not move furniture and cover everything in the house for a few nail pops and a couple feet of tape repair.
 
  #7  
Old 11-23-10, 11:50 AM
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Well..I probably shouldn't be posting this...but I have added a bit of paint to spackle (and stucco patch) to avoid painting. You have to be pretty precise and do test patches on scrap to let it dry completely and do a comparison.

It's pretty much a pain. Might be easier to do the repair..get a good paint match to the existing material and use a flat paint dabbed on with a brush to blend it in.

Invisible..prob not...but most likely you'd be the only one that would know.
 
  #8  
Old 11-23-10, 11:55 AM
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I may just do some trial and error on some scrap drywall. Try checking different water amounts and maybe pick up some light grey paint to add and do a few small mixes.
 
  #9  
Old 11-23-10, 12:52 PM
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Paint is a protective coating, if this were my house, I'd make plans to get it painted

You, however, are under no obligation to do so
 
  #10  
Old 11-23-10, 01:27 PM
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Generally if you are going to tint joint compound you add paint/colorant. It's almost impossible to get a perfect match even if you know the formula. Apparently j/c isn't made to the same specs as paint as far as coloring goes. Joint compound isn't formulated for any type of wear. It can and will absorb moisture from the air..... and moisture will deteriorate j/c over time. IMO it's never a good idea to leave texture unpainted!

I'm pretty good with colors [or at least I used to be ] but if I took the job, I'd paint it. I could get a better job and spend less time painting the ceiling than it would take to get the j/c coloring right. It's more than just adding color as the additives will change how the j/c dries.
 
  #11  
Old 11-23-10, 03:40 PM
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Wvphysics:

You should be aware that the reason why new homes are often built with textured walls and ceilings is NOT because everyone loves textured walls and ceilings. It's because texture hides problems with the drywalling, especially on ceilings with ceiling mounted light fixtures. The sharp angle of the lighting makes every defect look worse, and so builders texture over everything to avoid callbacks and complaints.

Take some film containers down to any paint store and ask them to fill those paint containers with

a) black colourant, which is really just soot (yep, really) suspended in glycerine. They use glycerine as the carrier fluid in paint colourants because it's equally soluble in both mineral spirits and water, so the same paint tinting colourants (and hence, same paint tinting machine) can be used to tint both latex and oil based paints.

b) Raw Umber colourant, which is a very dark brown that could be mistaken for black.

c) Brown Oxide colourant, which is chocolate brown in colour.

d) Yellow Oxide colourant, which is mustard yellow in colour

e) Titanium White colourant, which is titanium dioxide and is white in colour.

Now, if you're mixing your joint compound from a powder, I would dilute the colourant in water, and then add small amounts of that coloured water while mixing your joint compound. If you're using a premix joint compound, I would go to any place that repairs small kitchen appliances and ask from some worn out mixer blades. Put a worn out mixer blade in an electric drill and use that to mix little bits of the coloured water into your joint compound.

The amount of colour change you're going to get from increasing the amount of water or decreasing it is small.

You should be aware that glycerine is slower than water to evaporate, so if you percieve any wetness on the joint compound that lasts longer than you think it should, it's entirely because of the glycerine carrier fluid.

But, if it were my house, I'd see how hard it is to get that texture off. Flat is beautiful. Flat walls and ceilings are easier to repair, easier to paint and easier to clean. As long as you have textured walls or ceilings, you've got a headache if you ever have to repair them due to water damage or whatever.

You should also be aware that if you smoke, burn candles or incense in your house, then the walls are gradually going to change colour anyhow. That's due to something called "Brownian Motion" that predicts that as particles become smaller and smaller in size, relativistic effects become more and more important, and those particles start to behave like large molecules rather than Newtonian particles. So, accordian to Brownian Motion, more tiny soot particles from cigarette smoke, burning candles and incense are going to accumulate over cold surfaces than warm surfaces, and that's in fact what we observe on exterior walls in the homes of smokers. You can see lines where there are wall studs, and you can even see the locations of the drywall screws by the dirt collected directly over them. So, even if you get a tint formula that matches your walls and ceilings perfectly today, that same formula will be close, but not perfect as time goes on. Even if you don't smoke or burn candles or incense, just the dirt in the air from road grit, and other sources is going to accumulate on your walls and gradually change their colour slightly.
 
  #12  
Old 11-24-10, 10:08 AM
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What kind of texture are we talking about here? Are you talking popcorn? or knock down?
 
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