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Finishing Drywall corners


WML13's Avatar
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12-18-10, 04:03 PM   #1  
Finishing Drywall corners

I'm fixing up an old house for a possible rental unit. There is an entryway that has several pieces of damaged drywall,especially near the two doors. The doors open inward, so any wooden trim pieces would get hit by the door if I were to install them to hide the ends of the drywall that shows. Looking at them, it appears that the doors and frames were not built correctly in the first place, which probably is why the drywall is not protected. Is there a trim piece that is made to fit flush on the end of an exposed run of drywall that would protect it, and still allow a door to open and close right next to it?

 
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12-18-10, 04:28 PM   #2  
Do you me like a corner protector? Most common is the clear plastic ones that are usually used with wallpaper. You can also get wooden ones - they're a little heavier..... or you could trim out the end of the wall with some wood trim.

Would door stoppers work? either the kind that hooks to the hinge or mounts on the baseboard.

Could you supply us with a pic or two? then we'd have a better idea of what you have


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12-18-10, 05:47 PM   #3  
finishing drywall corners

I would be happy to take some pictures. Where should I send them?

 
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12-19-10, 04:33 AM   #4  
Post them here.

http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html


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12-20-10, 08:47 AM   #5  
The pictures of the walls are on Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket. Uploaded today (Monday) Anything else I have to do, or questions?

 
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12-20-10, 02:10 PM   #6  
That's the wrong link
we need the one where your pics are, not just the site.


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12-22-10, 09:46 PM   #7  
WML13:

Your door frame isn't done right. There's no way that drywall should come that close to a door that there's a risk the door will hit the drywall when it's opened or closed.

Take a look at this pic:



The studs inside that wall are 3 5/8 inches deep. The door jamb is 4 5/8 inches wide, and it's nailed to the cripple stud that frames the doorway so that the door jamb sticks out 1/2 inch on each side of the stud. That allows the surface paper of the drywall to be flush with the edges of the door jamb.

A door "casing" is then nailed to the edge of the door jamb to cover the gap between the door jamb and the drywall. (In the above photo, that door casing has been removed.)

Is it possible that this is a prehung interior door installed as an exterior door? I'm not a carpenter, but my understanding is that the exterior walls of houses will often be framed with 2X6's instead of 2X4's. Consequently the door jamb has to be wider to accomodate the thicker walls. (?)

 
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12-24-10, 11:19 AM   #8  
Finishing Drywall Corners

The door you can see the best on photobucket) was framed into a concrete block wall. I had to adjust the new studs to accommodate insulation and new drywall over the block wall next to the door. An amateur must have framed in the door, and I should have known that, and reframed it correctly myself, but here I am. Some suggested routing out the drywall on the door edges and installing wooden trim completely around the door. I thought there might be a thin drywall corner protector that could be nailed or glued there to protect it. Once that was in place, I could then even put some 3" decorative trim over that around the door. I look forward to your comments, and have a great holiday

 
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12-25-10, 04:45 PM   #9  
I found several types of drywall edge protectors at a local building supply store. I found a plastic "j" strip that comes in ten foot lengths that would do what I originally wanted to do. One of the associates there suggested extending the jamb out with what he called a jamb extention. to do the aforementioned job better. I did not see these, but will look at those too.

 
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01-01-11, 06:54 AM   #10  
A jam extender is simply a piece of 3/4" wood that is cut to the correct width so that it comes flush with the walls. Take a piece of 1x3 and hold it next to the door frame. Trace it and cut it to width. Then nail and glue it to the door frame. If the door casing is the problem then route the edge of the frame so that the wall fits under it and the fame lays flat.

 
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01-01-11, 10:14 AM   #11  
door jamb extensions

Since the doors open inward, there is not much I can do with the jamb except to rout the drywall around the door to make room for a 3/4" trim piece and glue it all around the frame (as you suggest) That will give me a base to attach some decorative trim around the door on top of it and the drywall.

thanks for your reply!

 
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