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Can I Save This Drywall?


Slump Buster's Avatar
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03-22-11, 06:29 AM   #1  
Can I Save This Drywall?

For reasons that completely escape me, the previous owners of my home decided to stud and drywall the basement and then cover up the outer walls (and only the outer walls) with cheapo panel. Ugh. I'm in the process of pulling off the panel -it was both glued and nailed to the wall.

*Ideally* I'd pull down the drywall and start new. The problem is that I just finished making an exercise room in a different part of the basement and neither myself nor my wife have the appetite for any more construction. So we were thinking of pulling down the paneling, fixing the drywall and then paint it up to the drop ceiling and put some moulding to hide any imperfections (maybe a smidge of panel that exists where the drop ceiling meets the wall).

I've attached a pic in the link below. As you can see some of the top paper peels off because of the glue. I've reached out to a couple of pros but I thought I would get some opinions here as well. Thank you VERY much in advance!

http://www.muchgooder.com/images/drywall.jpg

 
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03-22-11, 02:17 PM   #2  
Anywhere the drywall face paper is missing you need to prime with Zinnser's Gardz or an oil base primer. That will prevent the moisture in latex paint and/or joint compound from dissolving the gypsum and making the surrounding paper lift. Then you can skim coat the affected areas with j/c, sand, prime and paint.


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03-22-11, 04:10 PM   #3  
I recently had to remove some continuous mirrors in a very large bathroom- they have glued to the drywall with construction adhesive. What I ended up doing was I got a flap sanding disk that fits on a 4 1/2" grinder, and I carefully ground the construction adhesive off. I also used it to smooth any torn paper that was roughed up. Then I painted all spots with oil based Kilz like Mark said. The drywallers were able to skim coat and it looks fine.

 
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03-24-11, 08:03 AM   #4  
thanks a ton! I'm sorry I didn't see these sooner - I had subscribed to the thread and was waiting to see an email that never came.

Just so I have this straight, I would use the sander to remove the glue AND to smooth the areas where the paper had been torn? If this is true I would assume that I'd need to remove the loose paper by hand first? Also, am I better off priming the whole wall or just the spots with the missing paper? It would be easier to do the whole wall as the patches are all over the place.

 
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03-24-11, 08:31 AM   #5  
I've never used a sander on drywall. I've always scraped off the glue, cut the edges of the peeled paper back to sound paper [pulling on it might remove all the paper] and then use an oil base primer. it doesn't hurt anything if you prime the whole wall - whatever is easiest


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03-24-11, 08:53 AM   #6  
That's the thing - I have 40 feet of wall that look like what you see in the picture. Glue everywhere! If I could save a few hours of scraping by purchasing a $50 sander I would be a happy guy (I'm going to have to spend a few hours removing the panel nails as it is). As you said, once you start pulling off paper you never know where each pull will take you.

 
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03-24-11, 09:21 AM   #7  
XSleeper will likely chime in when he gets off work - I'm sure he can shed some light on the sanding process.


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03-25-11, 03:20 AM   #8  
I took a longer look at the walls this morning and I'm not so sure that I need to use a grinder after all. The glue seems to peel off neatly in long strips - for some reason I had it in my head that I'd have to scrape it off. So if that is the case, am I correct to assume that this really boils down to an exercise in trying to trim loose paper and removing the glue strips before I seal it?

 
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03-25-11, 03:27 AM   #9  
Yep, that should do it


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Last edited by marksr; 03-25-11 at 05:02 AM. Reason: fix typo
 
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03-25-11, 04:51 AM   #10  
Yeah, the only reason I suggested the grinder and flap disk was the the glue that I was removing was totally stuck, and peeling the glue off did more damage to the drywall paper than the grinding would.

As far as your paper that is torn and rough, I'd suggest you just sand it as smooth as you can with a course sanding sponge or some 80 grit sandpaper, just to remove most of the loose paper. Then after you prime it with the oil based primer you will probably want to hit it again with a light sanding since the primer will raise some more hairs. Then you're good to coat with some joint compound.

Glad to hear that most of the glue is peeling off w/out much trouble.

 
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03-25-11, 08:07 AM   #11  
Thanks again everybody, I really appreciate your help! I hate being an amateur with this kind stuff. Every time I post something like this I go and answer a few questions in other boards that are more my speed (electronics and software development). Paying it forward, I guess.

This is hopefully the last question. From what I had read in various forums I had assumed that my wall was damaged enough that it would need an initial thin coat of compound before doing the normal compound work (seams, corners, etc). If I sand and then seal and then sand again, would I have the need for such a thin coat? i guess I'm a little skeptical that I could get the paper sanded down to the point where it felt completely smooth.

 
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03-25-11, 01:40 PM   #12  
Don't feel bad about being an amateur when it comes to work around the house - we all started out not knowing anything

It's a little hard to say without being there and doing the work but you might be able to just mud the repairs. The biggest thing when it comes to sanding is using a sanding pole or basically anything that holds the sandpaper flat and level. Just holding the sandpaper in your hand will result in an uneven sand job. Of course the better job you do of applying the j/c will result in less need for sanding


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03-25-11, 05:58 PM   #13  
The purpose of sanding the torn paper is not so that it will be smooth enough for paint, it's to remove any loose paper prior to painting it with oil based primer. After you prime, you would sand again to smooth off the paper again, because the paint and your paint brush will usually lift a little MORE paper. You are doing all this so that when you skim coat over it (which yes, you will have to do) the water in the joint compound won't suck up into the bare paper and cause even more paper to come loose, which would make bubbles in your thin skim coat.

Don't worry about being an amateur, even some of us pro's are doing things for the first time every now and then and we have to learn just like anyone else. A little experience under your belt is all you need. We'll never know it all, although some guys like to think they already do. LOL!

 
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03-26-11, 01:58 PM   #14  
Have you looked next to an outlet to see if/what insulation is in the wall? Many "remudels" used f.g right against the concrete wall, or in a "diaper" (which is fine until finishing). Now would be the best time to check for mold in a lowest section of wall, easily patched when nearby. Have you found any mold yet as the panels would hide/stop the wetness effectively for awhile? If not, ignore the previous...LOL. If you don't learn something new everyday, you are not advancing....

Gary

 
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03-27-11, 08:05 AM   #15  
That is an excellent thought Gary. I have not seen any kind of evidence of any kind of water damage anywhere in the basement. The panel wraps all around the walls in both rooms on the outer walls so it seems to have been a conscious decision (they were never painted). The house is less than 20 years old and these rooms were done a few years after the house was built.

 
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