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getting same texture on the patch as is on the existing wall


nydiylady's Avatar
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05-29-11, 08:44 AM   #1  
getting same texture on the patch as is on the existing wall

I just did a patch on my drywall and it looked great until painted it a dark cranberry color. When you look at it from an angle you can see that the patch is flat and the rest of the wall has a little bit oftexture on it ...from I guess many coats of paint over the years. Is there any way to fix this.

 
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05-29-11, 12:54 PM   #2  
What I like to do is to thin down some joint compound to about paint consistency and then roll that over the patch, dabbing it on with a sponge will also work. Another option would be to buy one of those aerosol cans of orange peel texture and spray a light coat over the affected area.

The bad news is the dark color almost guarantees that you won't be able to make the touch up disappear You'll probably need to repaint the wall. Prime and touch up the repair first, maybe you'll get lucky, if not, having the repair the same color as the rest of the wall will make the repaint easier.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
nydiylady's Avatar
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05-30-11, 05:14 PM   #3  
Thanks for the help will try both of those things.

 
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05-31-11, 05:41 AM   #4  
I like to practice on scrap wood or cardboard until I've reproduced the texture, then move to the wall

 
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06-02-11, 09:59 PM   #5  
Painting with a roller leaves a "nubbly" texture on the wall.

I'd just roll a few more coats of paint on it to re-establish that nubbly texture.

If it's a latex paint, you can wrap the roller snuggly in a plastic bag so the paint stays wet between coats. Ditto for the paint tray.

If it's an oil based paint, you should be aware that simply having the oil based paint exposed to oxygen will cause it to partially cure. That's why oil based paints will form a skin over the paint while it's in storage. To prevent that chemical reaction with oxygen, put the roller and tray in a cold place, like a fridge or freezer. In the freezer, oil based paint will get as thick as soft ice cream, but it'll liquify as it warms up, and won't be harmed by having gotten cold and thick.

 
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06-03-11, 04:22 AM   #6  
Rolling multiple coats paint on the repair will replace the roller stipple so it will blend in with the rest of the wall - mimicking the roller stipple with j/c is faster since it can be done with 1 application.


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