How to remove drywall from cement wall?

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  #1  
Old 08-31-11, 12:24 PM
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How to remove drywall from cement wall?

Hello,

I'm in the process of remodelling my bathroom, and during demolition I discovered that one of the tub-walls had drywall (not cement board) installed directly onto the cement wall, probably glued on. There doesn't appear to be any water damage on the drywall (it was previously covered with tile), so I maybe I just got lucky with that.

I was planning on installing cement board (and then new tile) around the tub/shower walls, and I don't think simply covering up this drywall-glued-onto-cement with the cement board would be a good idea.

What is the best way to remove the drywall? Does it just require a lot of scraping, or is there a better way?

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-31-11, 04:43 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

How was the drywall installed? glue?

Drywall isn't all that stout, you should be able to easily scrape it off. It's possible some of the paper might stay adhered to the adhesive but I don't think it would be an issue.

If it doesn't all come off - post a pic or two and we'll see if we can help you decide what to do next

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 08-31-11, 08:30 PM
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Here are a few pictures of the way it looks now:

http://i1180.photobucket.com/albums/...y/IMG_0233.jpg
http://i1180.photobucket.com/albums/...y/IMG_0232.jpg
http://i1180.photobucket.com/albums/...y/IMG_0231.jpg

I can't say for 100% that I know it was installed using glue as I didn't put it in, but I don't see any screw heads so I'm not sure what other method would have been used. Of course maybe I just haven't uncovered the screw heads yet, as soon as I saw the concrete behind I stopped as I wasn't sure what to do next.

It's still in decent shape, and it's possble I could be able to scrape off the remaining mortar, patch the holes, prep it with something like RedGuard, and then install the tiles over top ... still using cement board on the other 2 bath walls. Is this a bad idea?
 
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Old 09-01-11, 04:22 AM
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I've not done much tile work and have never used any redguard, I would think it would be best to remove the drywall but you might try reposting in the tile section - Designing Kitchens and Bathrooms - DoItYourself.com Community Forums
 
  #5  
Old 09-01-11, 06:03 AM
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It was likely glued on with construction adhesive. Scraping/chipping it out is the only way to get it out.

Is this an outside wall? If it is, I would want to fur it out with 2x2 or(or 3s or 4s) and install some pink Styrofoam to get some insulation in there. Then put up poly and put up your cement board over that.
 
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Old 09-01-11, 08:13 AM
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Here's a quick sketch of the layout (roughly to scale):

http://i1180.photobucket.com/albums/...ey/Picture.jpg

The concrete wall in question is not an exterior wall, but the back bathtub wall and on the other side is the condo's storage/utility room. I don't know what's in there. Maybe they built a concrete wall as fire protection from an electrical source in the utility room? I'm not really sure.

Anyways, pushing the wall out 2 or 4 inches would push the bathtub further out into the room. 1) There is no extra space in the room to begin with, and 2) I would have to move the plumbing over for the bath/shower.

I have a plumber coming tomorrow (Fri Sept 2) afternoon to remove the old bath and install a new one. All the other bathroom walls and the ceiling are bare down to the studs, I'm just not sure what to do with this wall that has the drywall 'glued' directly to the concrete wall ...
 
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Old 09-01-11, 09:17 AM
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Is the utility rm heated? If not, the more insulation you can add the better. If nothing else, I'd at least add 3/4" foam board - but I'm not an insulation expert.

I would still recommend removing the drywall. It's never a good idea to have drywall attached directly to the block - masonry tends to attract and hold moisture which could cause the drywall to fail.
 
  #8  
Old 09-01-11, 09:45 AM
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I also agree with Mark. Remove the drywall. He has a good idea attaching treated 1x3's (3/4" x 2 1/2") to the wall, poly and then screw the cement board to the furring strips. The furring strips can be glued with construction adhesive or attached with concrete screws (Tapcons)

If it is not a "cold" wall then the insulation is up to you.

You should not have to re-plumb furring the wall 3/4" (or 1 1/2" for that matter)
 
  #9  
Old 09-01-11, 01:59 PM
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Ok thank you, I will go ahead and scrape off the old drywall. When I attach the furring strips to the cement wall, how long should I let it dry before hanging wallboard on it? Is over-night enough time for it to be secure enough to hold the weight of the cement board? I'm hoping to get all the walls back up by the end of the weekend.
 
  #10  
Old 09-01-11, 04:21 PM
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Over night should be plenty of time. Read the label of which ever adhesive you choose. It will likely be faster.
 
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