perlite wall texturing

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  #1  
Old 10-27-11, 06:15 PM
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perlite wall texturing

I have made several small repairs on my drywall walls & now I have several bald spots where the perlite texturing use to be. Homex
doesn't seem to sell this type of texturing. I tried sand & it doesn't match. I bought a small bag of perlite & the particles are too big. I even tried sawdust..that was a mistake. Sure could use some ideas at this point. Wife keeps asking me "when am I going to fix those
bald spots".
Roger
Here is a picture of my texturing
 
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  #2  
Old 10-28-11, 09:04 PM
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Can you grind the perlite particles to make them match?
 
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Old 10-29-11, 08:55 AM
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Tried making big particles into small ones..didn't work. I know this is a very common wall texture & all home owners/ contractors make repairs sometime . There has got to be an easy solution. I sent Homax an e-mail
Roger
 
  #4  
Old 10-29-11, 10:10 AM
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its hard to tell size in that picture but to me it looks liks small or fine popcorn texture. Unfortunatley it's hard to find fine. If you go to a drywall distrubutor you might be able to find it. I know USG fine is smaller compared to magnum, for example, so I would go with USG. If it's smaller than that then silica sand might work.
 
  #5  
Old 10-29-11, 05:29 PM
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That texture looks good. What does it not match?

If you need something finer than you can buy try screening it through a window screen
 
  #6  
Old 10-30-11, 01:10 PM
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It may be a fine "popcorn texture"...it was put on during that era. I wasn't very clear about the picture. This is what i am trying to match, my attempts look nothing like this.
Roger
 
  #7  
Old 10-30-11, 02:35 PM
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Get some "acoustic" texture material. Mix a little with water to a consistency of about pancake batter. Use a scrap of drywall or cardboard to practice on. Use a stiff whisk broom and dip it into the stuff then use your finger to rub across the end of the bristles to flick the mud onto the surface. Now if the aggregate is too coarse use the window screen. When you get the right combination of consistency of material and size of aggregate then do the whole patch this way.
 
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Old 10-31-11, 08:59 AM
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Thanks tightcoat...now that sounds promising. I'll have to give it a try...
 
  #9  
Old 11-06-11, 02:05 AM
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Cool Bluarc, tips for you.

Rodger I have more than 37 years experience in all matters drywall, metal framing welding, many suspended cielings as well as some carpenter work.

To tell you the truth that texture dose not look good. It is sparse and varies too much in size. Homex dose make a very good texture in a spray can and if I remember right there are three different size spray tips for the diferent sizes of texture you want to match.

I myself prefer the knock-down type texture you get a very nice medium to fine random patern and a flater (more even in depth) surface. It is much more pleasing to the eye. Then there is an orange peel stiple that you can spray with texture but here I prefer the paint roller type stiple again more pleasing to the eye.

If you use a Homex type hand held hopper-sprayer you can change the tips as desired for texture jobs. I have one of these at home and you can even do stuco finish with one on the out side of homes. The main thing here is to mix your texture in a larger container so that you have enough to do a room at a time, to keep the same consiatancy. Practice makes perfect. Have fun!

PS almost forgot I use in my spray hopper generap all purpose taping compound and thin that down as desired with a medium to large mixing tool that attaches to a 1/2 inch drill, dose a great job. For much larger jobs one can use the powder. Still I prefer the all purpose type as it has more glue in it and will not chip off as you sometimes see happen to texture. The less glue the cheaper and the easer to sand.
 
  #10  
Old 11-27-11, 12:52 PM
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I went with the Homex "orange peel" & with a little practice, it blended right in. Thanks for all your suggestions..
Roger
 
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