Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Drywall and casing question


olson2334's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 340
ND

02-14-12, 06:07 PM   #1  
Drywall and casing question

Hello,

I have a door that I had to pull the casing off and when it came off i noticed that the door sits a half inch off the door jamb so when i try and put up the new casing i cannot get the new casing to sit against the door as well against the wall. One side sits off either the wall or the jamb. I hope I am making sense.

How do i get this new casing to sit flush on both the wall and the jamb? I can see the original casing i took off they tried to shave the sheetrock back a bit and must have flexed the narrow casing to make it work but this new casing is a lot thicker and wider.

Any help would be appreciated.

THanks.

 
Sponsored Links
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,321
NE

02-14-12, 06:13 PM   #2  
Sounds like you may need to add a thin strip of wood onto the door jamb to act as a "jamb extension". Is it the same way all the way around the door, or is it just on one side?

Adding a 1/4" screen moulding to the perimeter of the door would probably help a lot.

You can also shave more sheetrock off the wall so that your casing can "tip" back toward the jamb. Place your casing against the door and make a pencil line around the outside so that you can see how much drywall you'd need to chisel down.

Keep in mind that when you tip the casing in this way, your casing miter becomes a compound angle.

 
olson2334's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 340
ND

02-15-12, 05:02 AM   #3  
Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately it is not the same all the way around and only on the one side. the others seem good.

Since the gap is greatest at the bottom and then things out as it goes up, what is the best method of creating this thin strip? I have a piece of oak i could use but do i use a skill saw to cut the piece tappered like this? I would guess it would be best to use a table saw but I am not sure how i would go about cutting a strip like this on it?

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,809
TN

02-15-12, 05:22 AM   #4  
Is the casing to be painted? or stained/natural? With paint you can hide a lot with caulking.

Personally I wouldn't want to try to rip a small strip with a skil saw, a table saw would be a lot safer. A pic or two might help us better understand what you are dealing with - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
lefty's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 9,238
WA

02-15-12, 09:40 AM   #5  
Ripping a taper on a tablesaw is tricky. Ripping it with a Skilsaw is approaching suicide.

If the jamb and casing are going to be painted, use several thin stips of 18" matrerial (a long one, a shorter one, and more shorter ones), one on top of the other, to build up the taper you need, and caulk the voids. Also, like XSleeper said, shaving off some sheetrock may be necessary.

Dealing with out-of-plumb walls requires some creativity.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,321
NE

02-15-12, 10:33 AM   #6  
Lefty's got some good ideas. When I need to make a taper like that on a table saw, I'll use 2 pc of wood. One is the guide (the one on bottom) and the one on top is the piece that will be tapered. I hope I can explain this so that you can understand it. (easier to do than to explain)

Let's say your bottom board is a nice straight 1x4x8', and you will be cutting the shim out of a 1x2x8'. Set the fence on your table saw so that the 1x4 will fit between the fence and the blade. Using some brad nails or short screws, tack the piece you wish to taper (the 1x2x8') on top of the 1x4x8'. If you want it to go from 0" to 1/2", position it on the left side of the 1x4x8', so that it hangs 1/8" over the left side of the board (assuming that your blade is 1/8" thick, it will remove that first 1/8" from the board... which will be the 0" part of your taper. The other end of the board you wish to taper would be placed so that it hangs 5/8" over the left side of the 1x4x8'. (again, your blade will remove 1/8" of material, leaving you with 1/2").

When you run the piece through the table saw, your shim will be the waste that falls off the left side of the blade.

Keep in mind that the piece you create will look best if it is straight. If your "shim" needs to be 1/2" at the bottom... and it's 0" when you come up 6ft off the floor (for example) just make that shim 6 ft long and straight from point A to point B. Don't worry about any other measurements in between.

 
Search this Thread