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Do you need to use tape/mesh for the seams when repairing drywall


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05-29-12, 04:55 PM   #1  
Do you need to use tape/mesh for the seams when repairing drywall

I need to access the inside of the drywall for inspection (wiring) purposes. So I will be making a square cut 5" x 5" perfect square in the drywall. I called Home Depot today and they told me that I need to use wood which will act as a support for the replacment piece of drywall but I do not need to tape or use mesh for the seams. Can I just go ahead and spread the spackle/compound over the seams without laying tape or mesh over the seams ? This will be my first time working with drywall so please make any suggestions that will help me guide me through this small project.

Thanks in advance


Last edited by Victor43; 05-29-12 at 06:38 PM.
 
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05-29-12, 05:05 PM   #2  
As usual..they were wrong (I used to work there...so no hating). You need tape on any patch like that.

There's another way of doing it where you keep the paper attached to the patch and overlap the hole with that. Might be a good method for what you describe. You still need some sort of backing, either wood or clips.

I'll leave it to the Pro's to provide guidance on that method.


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05-29-12, 05:34 PM   #3  
Thanks for the reply. I did have two more questions to ask. First what tape will I need for this job as they are several different types available as per the Home Depot website ? Also before placing the tape on the seams do I add a layer of drywall compound over the seam first and then right away add the tape ? After going through some Youtube videos it appears that a layer of compound goes on first then the tape and then the second layer of compound.

Thanks again.


Last edited by Victor43; 05-29-12 at 06:40 PM.
 
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05-30-12, 03:55 AM   #4  
You can either insert wood longer than the hole and screw it to the drywall [screw the repair piece to the wood also] then mud and tape or you can cut a piece of drywall 3" bigger than the hole, cut off the excess on the back side ]leaving the paper on the front. The excess paper would take the place of the tape.

Paper tape holds up better than the self adhesive mesh tape. You apply a thin coat of joint compound to both sides of the joint, press the tape in place and then smooth it out removing excess j/c with a drywall knife. It generally takes 3 coats of j/c [drying between coats] to finish drywall. The last coat would be sanded.

Any drywall repair made without using tape/paper over the joints will result in cracks sooner or later


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05-31-12, 11:35 AM   #5  
Many thanks for the reply. I think I have enough information to start/finish my project. Victor

 
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05-31-12, 03:55 PM   #6  
Ok I still need some help. I have enclosed a picture of the area that needs
to be repaired. The distance from the outside of the drywall to the inside
concrete wall the distance is 1 1/8" and the drywall thickness is 5/8".
Therefore the distance between the inner side of the drywall and the concrete wall is as follows: 1 1/8" - 5/8" = 4/8" or 1/2". Can I still use wood supports to hold the new cutout piece of drywall in place or would there be another way of going about this ? I am not sure how thick are the wooden supports.

Thanks again[ATTACH=CONFIG]845[/ATTACH]

Victor

Attached Images
     
 
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06-01-12, 03:48 AM   #7  
That's definitely different than standard building practices in the USA.
What's on the other side of the wall? Is it above or below grade?
You could still use wood but it would need to be 3/8" thick and that doesn't leave much room for fasteners. If moisture isn't an issue, I'd be tempted to mix up some hot mud [like durabond] and use it like mortar to hold the drywall in place.


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06-01-12, 06:04 AM   #8  
That is a good idea mark!
Another option is to use some big blobs of construction adhesive and glue the drywall to the cement wall. Just don't push it too far back.


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06-02-12, 06:44 AM   #9  
Thanks Marksr.

I'm in Canada and have no idea what the building code is here. The other side of the wall is the basement of the next door neighbors. The above picture displays a wall in our basement of our home. It is below grade. We have never had an issue with moisture in the basement before so perhaps going with your second suggestion might be better. Can you provide any resources/links or videos that shows how mortar/hot mud should be properly applied ?

 
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06-02-12, 08:05 AM   #10  
"Hot mud" like Durabond is just a mud that you have to mix with water. It sets up by curing rather then drying like regular mud. You want to use it sparingly as it is very hard to sand down. It is best to under fill the patch and then finish off with some regular mud that is easy to sand.

As I said, I would just get a tube of construction adhesive and put some big dollops on the patch of drywall. Put the patch in so it ends up even, or slightly recessed, to the rest of the drywall. Let set up and then tape with paper tape and regular joint compound.

The process would be the same using Durabond as above.

Check youtube for videos.


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06-02-12, 09:05 AM   #11  
Hello Tolyn.

Sorry to be a bother but I had some more questions. The adhesive that you are describing, where on the new patch do I apply it ? Along the edges (all 4 of them) or on the side that faces the concrete wall ? Also what do mean by "Let set up" ?

Thanks for the help.

 
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06-02-12, 10:10 AM   #12  
No bother, that is why I come to this site.

Put the adhesive either on the concrete or the back of the drywall. Use a good sized blobs (I would use 4) so that it will span the gap and contact both the drywall and the concrete.

"Let it set up" as in let it dry. Construction adhesive, like liquid nails I believe, takes a couple of hours to overnight to fully cure. You just don't want the patch to be moving around while your trying to finish tape it.

A tube of liquid nails is about $2.


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06-02-12, 10:58 AM   #13  
Liquid nail didn't even occur to me although it's probably your best bet since it won't take but one tube, I always have durabond on hand but rarely any liquid nail. There are other brands of adhesive that will also work. The main thing is to get the patch piece adhered in place. Moisture won't be an issue since the other side of the wall is the neighbors living space.


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06-02-12, 12:02 PM   #14  
Thanks to both, marksr and Tolyn for their replies. I think I'll try the liquid nails as suggested. Victor.

 
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