removing mortar from glazed tub?

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Old 07-23-12, 11:35 AM
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removing mortar from glazed tub?

Is it possible to remove dried mortar from a glazed tub without causing damage to the glaze? my tile guy was not very careful about protecting the tub surface, now several clumps of stone are making it impossible to take a bath in comfort.
 
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Old 07-23-12, 11:39 AM
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You hired someone to do the job, make them come back and clean up the mess.
 
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Old 07-23-12, 01:35 PM
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I fired them for doing a crap job and finished the tile myself so asking them to come back to fix the drips would be rather awkward. This one will have to be a DIY fix it
I was thinking about scraping it off then using a tub glaze repair kit to touch up the damaged areas. Has anyone had luck with glaze repair kits?
 
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Old 07-23-12, 02:24 PM
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Is it possible to remove dried mortar from a glazed tub without causing damage to the glaze?
Is it mortar or grout? Have you tried wetting it with an acid to see if that will start to dissolve it? Even a mild acid such as vinegar might be strong enough to see if there's a reaction.
 
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Old 07-23-12, 02:44 PM
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If you choose to scrape it, use a plastic scraper. I agree with trying to soften it first, however.
 
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Old 07-24-12, 08:16 AM
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its the grey mortar that went under the floor tiles. i tried putting nail polish remover on it but had no luck. I'll try something a little stronger.
 
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Old 07-24-12, 08:20 AM
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I'd try to soften it as already advised, then a plastic scraper like Chandler mentioned. Anything left after that I would attempt to remove with a Mr. Clean magic eraser.
 
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Old 07-24-12, 08:45 AM
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i tried putting nail polish remover on it but had no luck. I'll try something a little stronger.
Yes, it's about acidic strength. It's about creating a chemical reaction. Most mortars tend to be highly alkaline, and to react with acids. That's why Muriatic Acid, which is thinned Hydrochloric Acid, is used to wash the mortar spills off brickwork.

Acetone wasn't a bad first shot.
 
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Old 07-24-12, 11:58 AM
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Three things

1. Muriatic acid might damage the glaze. Start with a dilute mixture and don't let it stay on the glazed surface too long. Maybe use an eyedropper to put it directly on the mortar and only on the mortar.
2. If there is a lot of acrylic in the mortar lacquer thinner will help soften that. I don't know what it will do to the glaze.
3. A plastic scraper will do less damage to the glaze than will a steel one. Keep water running when you scrape it to move the sand away from where you are scraping so you don't have the aggregate scratch the finish.
 
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Old 07-24-12, 01:55 PM
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Jenn, don't use petroleum based products on it. Use caustic solutions like vinegar and an eye dropper. The cement product is water based, but the components bind together chemically, and they need to come apart that way.
 
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Old 07-24-12, 03:25 PM
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I used to work a lot with acrylic modified Portland cement products. It stuck tenaciously to the tools. Nothing like a hawk and trowel so gummed up they weigh twice what they should.
Acetone would not touch it.
Muraitic acid would not touch it.
Lacquer thinner would soften it.
Try the acid first.
If there is a lot of adhesive in the mortar then try the lacquer thinner.
Put a little of the acid on, let it work then scrape with a plastic scraper like a credit card and run water to flush away the material you remove lest you scratch it worse. If acid softens the material you don't have to get it all at once. Use acid, let it work, scrape the surface a little flush it with water. Do it all again.

Or you can file a claim for damages against the tile contractor. Of course he will say you did not let him finish the job so maybe you caused the droppage.

Is the tub new? By glazed to you mean porcelain on cast iron or steel?
 
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