Patching to Painting

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  #1  
Old 07-24-12, 03:41 PM
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Smile Patching to Painting

Apartment

A door, you can put your fist through one side of it.

Patched hole with drywall compound - Fix It All Patching compound.

Wait compound to dry (heat) to white color turns tan. Sandpaper dried compound - 3M General Purpose Sandpaper - 100 Medium.

Paint enitred door with patched area - Paint: Oil based (previous paint job was oil based), Semi-Gloss Enamel - Pastel Based C201 1B.

First coat added yesterday, second coat added today.

Will paint PEELED from the patched area?

See pics attached. The first pic is the damaged. The second pic is after compound was applied BEFORE sanding. My hand is to show the actually size of the repaid.HELP! Name:  picture001.jpg
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Size:  16.3 KBName:  picture002.jpg
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  #2  
Old 07-25-12, 04:06 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'm not sure I understand the question

How was the hole repaired? completely filled with joint compound? use of paper or mesh to span the hole? was the area next to the hole sanded to help the j/c adhere? did you remove the sanding dust before priming?

Oil base paint will adhere fine to j/c providing there isn't any dust on it.
 
  #3  
Old 07-25-12, 04:45 AM
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Did you use a setting type compound like Durabond or EasySand?
If so was it truly dry or only set. It will take a while for a thick patch to dry.

That patch looks a little rough. Maybe you should sand it a little more to make it flush.

Make sure it is dry and clean and try again.
 
  #4  
Old 07-25-12, 07:12 AM
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I'm concerned about how you supported this patch from behind. Assuming it is sufficiently supported, it might still be too wet even though the color changed. Also, you don't mention using a primer, you should (and an oil based one if you're using oil based paint).
 
  #5  
Old 07-25-12, 05:13 PM
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How was the hole repaired? completely filled with joint compound?

Dry powder compound (before mixed with water)


use of paper or mesh to span the hole?

I don't understand


was the area next to the hole sanded to help the j/c adhere? did you remove the sanding dust before priming?

No cleaning or sanding around the hole. It wasn't dirty.


 
  #6  
Old 07-25-12, 05:17 PM
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Did you use a setting type compound like Durabond or EasySand?
I used FIX-IT-ALL patching compound mfg'd by Custom Building Products, Seal Beach, CA

If so was it truly dry or only set. It will take a while for a thick patch to dry.
It dried in 1 hour.

That patch looks a little rough. Maybe you should sand it a little more to make it flush.

The picture shows the the dried compound before sanding.


Make sure it is dry and clean and try again.

After sanding, it appeared to be dry, clear and smooth.


 
  #7  
Old 07-25-12, 05:24 PM
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I'm concerned about how you supported this patch from behind.

The Damaged hole did not go through the door. There was a middle backing or wall inside the door.

Assuming it is sufficiently supported, it might still be too wet even though the color changed.

When the compound was drying with in an hour, it felt very warm (not hot) and changed color from white to tan. The Sanding after was easy and smooth.

Also, you don't mention using a primer, you should (and an oil based one if you're using oil based paint).

The entire door, both sides< for the exception of the addition (the patched hole) was previously painted with oil-based. I used a new oil base to paint over it. But the patched hole was a different surface than of the door. So I was hoping that the new oil base paint will have a different "situation" after the paint dries. Will the paint peel off the patch hole area, only? Or not?


 
  #8  
Old 07-25-12, 05:27 PM
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Thumbs up Thank you!!!!!!!!!!

:d thank you all for responding! I hope my response his helping. Again, thank you all!
 
  #9  
Old 07-26-12, 05:24 AM
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I'm not familiar with the 'fix it all' but is sounds like it's a setting compound similar to durabond. On drywall it's common practice to use paper tape or mesh to span the hole. This also helps to prevent the patch from cracking along the edges of the hole. The edges of the gloss paint should be sanded to help the patching compound adhere better. I assume you just stuffed the hole full of the patching compound and didn't bring it past the edges of the hole.

Both for best adhesion and looks, it would have been better to prime the repair before applying the oil base enamel. I don't think not priming will be a big issue. If the patch wasn't completely dry it might burn the color or gloss out of the paint. Providing the existing paint was clean, the new paint won't peel off of the old.
 
  #10  
Old 07-26-12, 03:42 PM
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The compound patch was new. No old paint on the patch. This is first layer of paint peeled on top of the patch, alone. Then added two coats on this compound patch.
 
  #11  
Old 07-27-12, 04:27 AM
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So the 1st coat of paint over the patched peeled and you've since repainted it ??

If so, I expect the compound wasn't dry enough to accept paint.
 
  #12  
Old 07-27-12, 05:18 PM
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The compound was dry and hard enough to sand. I did not paint until the next day.
 
  #13  
Old 08-01-12, 05:32 PM
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And you said this is a hollow-core interior door........

Gary
 
  #14  
Old 08-07-12, 08:03 PM
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A hollow door with a middle inside wall
 
  #15  
Old 08-15-12, 12:38 PM
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I have never seen inside walls, per-say. Most have corrugated cardboard glued in a serpentine pattern to hold the skins apart correctly. I'd just replace the door, 20-30 dollars. Any patch would show; sooner or later. Best would be pulling the door, remove the top or bottom edge solid wood spacer (1-1/4" wide) and slip in a skin piece slightly larger than the hole after fishing the string (tied behind/in center of patch) through. Pull the piece close to final, add glue all around from the hole side, pull taught, tie off till glue sets. Cut string, patch over new skin with Bondo exterior, prime/paint. Replace top/bottom wood edge filler with glue, rehang. Might work some non-expanding canned foam in there also...

Gary
 
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