Repairing rhinolited wall

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  #1  
Old 02-15-13, 03:10 PM
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Repairing rhinolited wall

Hi all

I have a problem with the rhinolite finish in my bathroom. Recently the basin that was siliconed onto the wall (don't get me started on that though) pulled off the wall taking some rhinolite and paint with it. In an attempt to scrape the loose material from the area I discovered that there are huge patches of loose rhinolite all over the wall so of course we removed that all. We have now about 1/3 of our bathroom wall cleared down to the plaster. Unfortunately the rest doesn't come off easily.

So, how can we remove the rhinolite or do we have to reskim the wall to level off the cleared area? (Which really sounds like a lot of work)
 
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  #2  
Old 02-15-13, 05:08 PM
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How large an area are you needing to refinish? Try to convert it to square yards or square feet for us metrically challenged people. How thick is the finish? 3mm? How thick is that in fractions of inches?

Seems to me it would not be much work to reskim the area with RhinoLite or drywall mud. If you use the RhinoLite keep the old work clean. Don't lap the new material onto the old. Trowel it through its set and it should turn out exactly flush with the existing. You might need to use a mist of water to lubricate the trowel as you are troweling it through the setting process.
 
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Old 02-15-13, 06:29 PM
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Ok well I have roughly 18 sq m which is 193 sq feet (is that right? seems like a high number).

The stuff that's coming off is maybe 1mm at absolute most (1/25 inch) and some is thinner, which is harder to get off.

What does "Trowel it through its set" mean? You mean use the existing level to smooth the new stuff but scrape it off the old stuff? Sounds hard.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 03:25 AM
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"Trowel it through its set"
That means to keep troweling it until the RhinoLite starts to set up [dry] That helps you to get a nice smooth finish. Misting it with water helps to lubricate the trowel so it smooths the RhinoLite instead of trying to drag some of it off.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 05:58 AM
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Oh thanks. So one other question. I gather it's actually a bad idea to have rhinolite in the bathroom as evidenced by our little problem. Will using plaster primer and enamel protect it well enough?
 
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Old 02-16-13, 06:04 AM
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Oh and do we use a metal trowel or that rubber foam one?
 
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Old 02-16-13, 07:50 AM
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You would use a metal trowel. I'm not very good with a trowel so I always use a wide drywall knife when applying a skim coat. I've never applied plaster. I don't know a lot about plaster but always assumed the same stuff was used throughout the entire house.

Since bath rms have a harsher environment that the rest of the interior it pays to use the correct primer and paint. Bare minimum for the finish paint [walls and ceiling] is a latex enamel [any sheen is ok] A bath paint is even better as it has more mildewcide and is formulated for the harsher environment. You should also run the exhaust fan during and after the shower is used.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 01:58 PM
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Our house is plastered with rough plaster but I think cement plaster is the usual thing here, not gypsum. We don't use drywall like you do though, most of our houses our brick and plaster. We just wanted a smooth finish so I suppose that's why this guy did it.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 07:53 PM
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In the states back in the days when houses were still plastered sometimes Keenes cement was used in kitchens and bathrooms. It is a harder, denser and somewhat more water resistant finish than whitecoat which is lime and gauging plaster. Keene's will not bond to Portland cement plaster.
All I know about RhinoLite is what I saw on a couple of web sites. The youtube video I watched looked like it is probably a lime/gauging finish. The setting process is gradual giving you plenty of time to trowel it a time or two or three as it sets. Each time it gets a little harder and denser. It is an acceptable finish for a bathroom.

How much of your bathroom still has the finish on it?
 
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Old 06-20-13, 12:47 PM
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I don't really know what those are but it sounds like Portland refers to normal lime cement and Keenes to gypsum, correct? Rhinolite is gypsum but not necessarily harder than cement.

As far as I can tell using a bonding liquid such as PlasterKey should solve the bonding issue. I'm guessing the guy who did it initially did not.

We are only getting to this now, starting tomorrow; we hired someone in case I messed it up! lol

We will use PlasterKey under the Rhinolite then primer over that and then eggshell enamel.

Last question; how long after the Rhinolite is applied can I paint the primer on?

PS someone asked how much is left on the walls. One wall is 100% fine and the other 3 have about 50% left/removed.
 

Last edited by GPSJane; 06-20-13 at 02:05 PM.
  #11  
Old 06-20-13, 02:22 PM
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It's been a long time since I've painted new plaster but the paint stores used to have a piece of tape they'd give you to put on the plaster to tell if it was cured enough - I assume they still have it. If I remember correctly if the tape turns red, the plaster isn't cured yet ...... but maybe it was the other way around.
 
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Old 08-25-13, 04:55 AM
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Rhinolite not finished properly

Hello all. The guy we hired to do this job did not really know what he was doing so I fired him before he could do too much damage. Because we could not find anyone to do this we decided to do it ourselves.

So now we have done 2 (of 3) walls and done an ok job. Unfortunately my husband sucks at this so where he floated half of one wall he did a terrible job. It is all rough and he gouged out long scratches plaster.

I'll just make him my dagga boy and do it myself. But now what do we do about the damaged wall? It says we can't sand rhinolite. Can we truly not? Do we redo the entire wall with another thin coat, even where its ok? (Tell me we don't have to try to remove anything.) What is the thinnest layer we can add? Do we need to use bonding liquid to bond the next layer to the old? Do we need to wait for it to dry?

Also, what are your thoughts on adding bonding liquid to the rhinolite mix? The contractors all do it but the manufacturer specifically states not to do it.
 
  #13  
Old 08-25-13, 09:18 AM
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I think, were it mine, that I would just fill the gouges with joint compound and then sand it. I think the nice shiny surface you have on the rest of the wall is so hard that you will not do any serious damage if you sand lightly on the gouges you fill with joint mud and use fine sand paper. The joint mud is enough softer that it will sand flat well before the
Rhinolite is scratched.
 
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Old 08-25-13, 03:31 PM
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Oh cool. What is joint compound made of? I wonder what it is called here. These gouges are not so very deep, will they really fill up ok?

This is what we managed to do;




We're not actually worried about a smooth glossy surface as we're painting with enamel. We just don't want weird depressions and gouges in the finished wall.
 
  #15  
Old 08-26-13, 03:36 AM
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Joint compound is what is used to fill the gaps/depressions is drywall. You should be able to find it anywhere drywall is sold. Ready mix j/c comes in buckets [occasionally a plastic bag in a box] normally in 1 gallon and 5 gal quantities. There are also setting compounds that come in bags, a dry powder that you mix with water. Setting compounds dry quicker and aren't water soluble like ready mix j/c.
 
  #16  
Old 08-26-13, 05:19 AM
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Ok, I know what you mean. Gyproc also has smooth stuff called RhinoGlide. It comes in powder form. It does not get floated the same. I hope I can get it smooth with no lines..

I'm a bit worried that putting that over dry Rhinolite will cause lifting.
 
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