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drywall damage


turtlechi's Avatar
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02-18-13, 01:23 PM   #1  
drywall damage

Hello,
I am new here so I hope I do this right. We had a new shower installed in one of our bathrooms. After the men left I started to remove the wall paper. The walls were not primed I guess as the drywall came off with the paper. I have a area of about 3x6 feet that is just brown paper. The other area's also have damage but not as bad as this area. My question is this. Do I take off all of the drywall down to this layer or do I just sand and then prime? I have ordered Gardz to prime the walls. I could send a picture if this would help with answers.
Thank you for any help.
Susan

 
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02-18-13, 01:26 PM   #2  
Welcome to the forums.

The drywall came off or just the paper? Do you have exposed gypsum? If so, then the Gardz is the right product - seal the exposed gypsum with it and then you'll have to skim coat the wall smooth with joint compound before priming and painting. You typically only need to remove anything which is loose - once the wallpaper is gone, anything holding in place well usually stays.

 
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02-18-13, 01:34 PM   #3  
Pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html


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02-18-13, 03:10 PM   #4  
pictures

here is one picture with just a little brown patch.

 
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02-18-13, 03:15 PM   #5  
picture 2

Here is the worst part of the wall. The top of the drywall is gone. Someone told me to take all the paper off to the same level and then prime and then use compound over all of the walls. This was under the wall paper. The biggest one I did take a few parts out to make it one instead of many little white spots. Now I am not sure what to do.
Thanks,
Susan

 
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02-19-13, 04:02 AM   #6  
I've seen worse. Prime your walls with Gardz and when it's dry, apply a thin coat of joint compound over the entire wall. Sand when dry and touch up the j/c as needed. Once you are satisfied the wall looks good, remove the sanding dust, prime and paint. Sometimes the primer will reveal areas that aren't quite good enough. No biggie, apply j/c as needed, sand, spot prime and you are ready for the finish coat.


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02-19-13, 08:02 AM   #7  
As Mark said - that's not so bad. However, if you're not familiar with skim coating a wall here is a LINK that can provide some helpful instruction.

I have never used the "squeegee knife" I usually use a 12" drywall knife. The squeegee looks interesting though.

 
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02-19-13, 08:15 AM   #8  
Wayne:

That's an interesting approach, it looks pretty fool-proof. I'm going to have to try that the next time I have to skim a wall.

 
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02-19-13, 09:42 AM   #9  
I've not personally done it that way but I did paint behind one drywall outfit that used that method on the higher end homes - it does help make for a nice level substrate to paint.


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02-19-13, 09:49 AM   #10  
thanks

Thank you all for your help. I don't have the gardz yet. It should be here today or tomorrow. Should I sand the walls at all before I use the gardz? This may take me awhile to finish but when I am done I will try to post new pictures. Thanks for the link I will look at it now.
Susan

 
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02-19-13, 09:51 AM   #11  
Sanding first won't hurt and depending on how rough [or not] the walls are now, it might save you a little work later.


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02-19-13, 09:52 AM   #12  
Thank you for showing me how to post pictures. I have not used photo bucket in a very long time.
Susan

 
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02-19-13, 12:35 PM   #13  
joint compound

Hi,
Ok I read the link you sent. Do I need to use the different type of compound in the bigger places? Or can I use the compond and not make it thin in those places? I ordered the magic thing.
Sorry for so many questions. I just want to do it right.
Susan

 
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02-19-13, 01:19 PM   #14  
I get the impression that the multiple passes pull the compound into the lower areas. That said, never tried that method before.

 
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02-19-13, 03:28 PM   #15  
You use the same j/c for it all. Thinning the j/c slightly will help it spread better with your drywall knife.

I ordered the magic thing.
What's that did I miss something?


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02-19-13, 05:23 PM   #16  
I think the magic thing is the squeegee knife.

 
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02-20-13, 04:04 AM   #17  
IMO rolling on thinned down j/c and then smoothing it out with a wide knife is more trouble than it's worth for a bath rm. That method is geared towards skimming a whole house - or a lot of long walls. I'd just thin the j/c slightly and apply it with a 12" knife.


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