stumped by wall texture!

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  #1  
Old 09-03-13, 07:37 AM
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stumped by wall texture!

Hi everyone, the house that i live in was my great grandmothers and the walls have a very unique texture to them, my father and i have never seen it anywhere else and have had a hard time finding anything similar online. i am wondering if anybody knows anything more about how it would have been done, it looks sort of veiny and my closest guess would be tissue paper technique? we would love to be able to redo the patches he has had to do to match the rest of the old house, here is a link to some photos Flickr: kSav05's Photostream (sorry i could'nt get them to insert into or attach to the post) so you can see a few different examples of the texture(also, the 6th picture is the attempt to match it). thanks everyone for your time, I really appreciate the help!!
 
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Old 09-03-13, 11:39 AM
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Welcome to the DIY forum. I don't have a clue on how to accomplish that finish but I wanted you to know that people ARE here and looking at your post. Are you sure that isn't a plaster finish? It might be rather difficult to replicate with drywall materials.
 
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Old 09-03-13, 01:23 PM
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I'd try thinning down joint compound to somewhere around paint consistency [start out a little thicker] and pat it on with a big coarse sponge. It may take some experimenting [trial and error] to get it right.
 
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Old 09-03-13, 03:30 PM
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It is some sort of modified stomp but I'm leaning toward more of a texture left behind be rolling joint compound onto the wall. I would thin down some joint compound but not as thin as paint, more like pudding or till it sticks to a paint roller. You want the majority to just go on the wall like a very thick paint but also to be sticky enough to pull some random texture from time to time. If the joint compound is too thin, the peaks will fall down and not stand proud to the surrounding areas. I would practice on some scrap drywall (you can by 2x2 sheets at the home stores).
 
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Old 09-07-13, 01:42 PM
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thanks for the input! I really have no clue what it is done with, its original to the house which if memory serves me correctly was built in 1929/30 I'll have to relay this info to my dad and we'll have to try your ideas out, thanks again!
 
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Old 09-08-13, 04:14 AM
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If it's original to the house - it's plaster but most plaster textures can be replicated with j/c.
 
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Old 01-19-14, 08:46 AM
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I see, thank you again everybody! I think you might be right because there are some marks I've noticed on the ceiling in the bathroom where maybe it was done a little too loosely and the drips came further down!
 
  #8  
Old 01-19-14, 12:46 PM
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Wall Texture

Another possibility is that the texture may be one of a number of "plastic" textures that were developed in the 20's, 30's and 40's.

One that comes to mind is "Rufkote" and it was manufactured to give the opportunity to create one of a number of textures to plaster, wallboard and wood surfaces. I have encountered these types of finishes in older homes and they can usually be identified as being a different material by scraping into it lightly to determine if it has the same color and consistency as the underlying plaster finish coat.

In many cases the walls were coated with a glaze after the texturing process
to create a multi colored surface where the glaze would be wiped off the high spots.

The property that many of these texturing compounds had was that they were soft enough to apply easily but hard enough to not sag, pull or drip. Brushes, sponges trowels, just about anything you could imagine we're used to create the textures.

Replication is a matter of patience. Joint compound can be too cohesive at times so you may even have to investigate some other materials to get the proper look. Keep in mind that the surfaces have been painted and the number of coats of paint will impact the texture that you will be dealing with as well.
 
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