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Simple drywall repair with problem. Insulation behind.

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  #1  
Old 10-12-13, 01:55 PM
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Simple drywall repair with problem. Need help please!

So while moving a desk to a spot, I happened to slip and basically broke part of the drywall with the safe to cut diameter of 6x6 around the hole. Sounds easy to fix, of course, but there is an insulation bag type thing inside the wall (sorry for my terminology, I'm not great at this). To be honest, I'm not sure it even is insulation, but there's a thing on the inside (the opposite side of the wall is the outside of the house) that's soft with a card board-type bag covering it, so I can't really use a razor with the danger of cutting it open. Any ideas of how I could safely remove a 6x6 square so I can go ahead and patch it up? Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-12-13, 02:09 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

So this is an outside wall? Sounds like you hit plastic vapor barrier over insulation.
 
  #3  
Old 10-12-13, 02:11 PM
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Thanks. Well, the broken part is on the inside, I am just saying instead of being empty space, there's apparently just the barrier there so I'm not sure how to cut.
 
  #4  
Old 10-12-13, 02:16 PM
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Oh, I see what you're saying. Sorry, I really am not familiar with this stuff. It is an outside wall. For now, I've simply removed most of the broken drywall and covered it up with some tape.
 
  #5  
Old 10-12-13, 04:18 PM
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Most likely just Kraft paper on the back side of the insulation.
Not the end of the world if it does get cut.
Since you decided to only remove a 6" X 6" hole at least make sure it's a square hole so it's easy to make a patch to fill the hole.
Your going to have to use some backers so there's something to attach the patch to.
Simple strips of 1 x 4''s will work.
Install the backers with 1-1/4 sheetrock screws, install the patch with the same thickness drywall, and apply a thin layer of all purpose drywall compound. Apply paper drywall tape. Apply another thin layer of drywall compound.
It's going to take at least three more coatings.
No need to sand between coats just use a 6" wide drywall knife to knock off the high places.
The last coat gets sanded.
Any flaws are going to show. Just rub your hand across the repair. If you can feel it then it's going to show.
Low spots get filled, high spots get sanded.
Then the repair needs to be primed and painted two coats.
 
  #6  
Old 10-12-13, 04:53 PM
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Ok, very informative. Thanks, I'm visiting the hardware store tomorrow hopefully to get some materials.
 
  #7  
Old 10-12-13, 05:11 PM
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A hardware stores not going to have the sheetrock you need.
Go to Lowes or HD and look for there smaller pieces to do repairs.
No need to buy a whole sheet.
 
  #8  
Old 10-12-13, 05:19 PM
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Ok, I guess since HD is the closest I'll visit. Thanks for all the help.
 
  #9  
Old 10-12-13, 05:19 PM
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Ok, I guess since HD is the closest, I'll visit. Thanks for all the help.
 
  #10  
Old 10-13-13, 03:19 AM
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For a small piece of drywall, I'd drive around and find a house under construction. If they are in the drywall phase they'd likely give you a small piece of scrap drywall for free.

Another way to patch the hole is cut the drywall about 4" bigger than the hole and then remove the gypsum and paper backing [leaving the face paper] on the outer 2" or so. You would then mud the perimeter, set/press the patch piece in place and smooth it out with a drywall knife. Once dry, you'd apply more mud as needed, sand, prime and paint.
 
  #11  
Old 10-13-13, 08:21 AM
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I like cutting the plug first and then tracing around it on the wall and cutting out that shape - ensures a perfect match for your patch.
 
  #12  
Old 10-13-13, 06:16 PM
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I think I may be able to get a piece from a place I know of, just gotta wait for trash day! What exactly are those things like gypsum and paper backing? From where the drywall broke, I just pulled out the broken pieces and now there's just a hole (which I covered with painter's tape to prevent any more dust around here).
 
  #13  
Old 10-13-13, 06:23 PM
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Unfortunately, there also isn't room for 4 inches (on one side), since a window is about 5 inches away, but luckily not that much is broken. It's nice and sturdy just 2 inches off the edge, which is how much space I've reserved. Worst comes to worst, I have an extra inch to cut if need be. I also had a quick question, since I won't be sure how soon I can find time to patch it up. Is there any real purpose of outside wall drywall or is it just simply a wall like inside drywall? Would I need to replace it quickly? Or is it something I can get to when I can?
 
  #14  
Old 10-14-13, 03:53 AM
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Drywall is made from crushed gypsum rock. The factory turns it into a slurry and then sandwiches it between 2 pieces of paper before drying it out. The inside [gypsum] of the drywall isn't all that strong by itself and is easily damaged by moisture, the paper helps to protect it.

To make the type of patch I described, you cut the patch piece about 4" larger giving you 2" on every side of the hole. The amount of overlap doesn't have to be precise. Basically you remove everything on the perimeter of the back side of the drywall [gypsum and paper backing] leaving a 2" band of excess paper on the front. The unstripped part of the drywall fills the hole and the excess paper is used as the tape and secures the patch [with the mud] to the existing drywall. Hopefully I explained that where it made sense.

If your vapor barrier is intact, it shouldn't hurt to leave it open until you get to it.
 
  #15  
Old 10-14-13, 12:01 PM
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"that's soft with a card board-type bag covering it"----- that may be your asphalt-faced paper vapor retarder, IMO, cover the hole with foil/tape as you lost the air barrier with the missing drywall, admitting air/moisture from room to degrade the insulation R-value in that cavity, plus adding moisture. You can cut the vapor paper and still be effective as it is area weighed, not like the air barrier.

Gary
 
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