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Drywall Mud and Priming


Peter Fulton's Avatar
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11-15-13, 06:22 AM   #1  
Drywall Mud and Priming

I'm painting a room. I did a bunch of repair with drywall compound then I sanded and primed with kilz. After that I noticed a couple very small flaws (a couple nail holes that had sunken in). I patched those couple spots then never spot primed over them... I went straight to latex. Now after the first coat of latex I can see the areas that I patched without priming.

Question: Will they still be visible after my 2nd coat of latex?


This is what I'm using:
SHEETROCK® Brand Lightweight All Purpose Joint Compound with Dust Control

 
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Pilot Dane's Avatar
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11-15-13, 06:34 AM   #2  
It depends on how the area looks. More layers of paint will obscure differences underneath and a thicker coarser nap roller will create more texture which can further help conceal flaws.

 
Peter Fulton's Avatar
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11-15-13, 07:55 AM   #3  
Thanks for the response. I think it's just the mud soaking the paint in differently than the rest of the wall that has been primed. That's why I'm hoping a second coat alleviates the problem. Fortunately I am using a thick nap for the very reason you mentioned... these are 80 yr old plaster walls which are in terrible shape. I need all of the camouflage I can get.

 
wildbill7145's Avatar
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11-15-13, 08:02 AM   #4  
Can also depend on what quality of paint you're using. Some of the higher quality paints have better hiding properties than the cheaper brands. Shouldn't matter what type of drywall compound you're using.

As Pilot Dane said, using a thicker nap roller will leave more paint on the walls thus slightly better chance of covering those little sections you're seeing.

Just noticed the above post. Around here there are lots of homes with plaster walls that are in pretty rough shape. What paint sheen are you using? The higher the sheen, the more imperfections you're going to see. Lower the sheen, less imperfections will stand out.

 
Peter Fulton's Avatar
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11-15-13, 09:06 AM   #5  
I'm using Benjamin Moore Aura with an eggshell finish... the finish could be an issue I suppose but with 3 kids the ability to wash the walls is kind of high priority. Anyway, sounds like I'll just put on the second coat and see what happens. Worst case scenario is spot priming after then fact then spot painting with the finish coat. Thanks for the input.

 
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11-15-13, 09:48 AM   #6  
With Aura you should be fine. It's touted to be self priming. BM reps will tell you that you can roll out a room of raw unprimed drywall with it, however there's not a chance in hell I'd ever do that. If I'm using Aura, I usually don't bother priming small patches like nail holes, etc.

One good thing in your situation is that Aura paints have a slightly higher sheen comparable to other BM paints (ie. Aura eggshell is slightly higher in sheen than Regal or Ben eggshell). It does tend to hold up fairly well to children abusing the walls. At least as much as paint can protect.

 
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