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When to add Primer/searler


lightspeed's Avatar
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11-27-13, 12:45 PM   #1  
When to add Primer/searler

Fairly certain topic has come up but could not find info; may be due to how I phrased the question??

New drywall and just completed applying compound to joints and seams. I intend texturing after sanding but not clear whether to add primer/sealer before, after, or both, before painting. Comments/suggestions appreciated.

 
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11-27-13, 12:51 PM   #2  
New drywall is always primed before painting.
100% sure you want to texture? Must be a regional thing.
Texture is to cover up poorly done drywall finishing,
A dust catcher, near imposable to touch up when making a repair and have it match, a pain to paint.

 
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11-27-13, 02:02 PM   #3  
IMO priming before texture is optional. Priming the drywall prior to texture will make the texture dry at a uniform rate. The texture does need to be primed after it dries! Don't forget to wipe off all the sanding dust!!


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11-27-13, 04:17 PM   #4  
Don't forget to wipe off all the sanding dust!!
This is key before texturing to promote a good bond

What type of texture are you planning and can we be of assistance? Orange peel is relatively forgiving, easy to apply and will give you may years of durable finish. It also is relatively easy to repair should you have an issue down the road.

 
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11-27-13, 04:50 PM   #5  
Appreciate the comments; if understand correctly, after I have sanded and cleaned the ceiling and walls I can prime/seal the drywall. If determine to texture I should prime/seal once the texture has thoroughly dried, then paint??

I would rather not texture, and I will determine after I have sanded the ceiling and walls. It was time consuming but I was able to prep the bath, and laundry room where texturing was not necessary. The only room remaining is a big living room and if I have enough energy remaining I hope to prep where I won't have to texture; having said that, it's a small 1200 sq. ft. cabin/home built in the late 50's to mid 60's when building requirements were suspect and unconventional when it came to framing and installing doors and windows; etc. Some of the walls were not framed, or plumb, nor rooms with square corners, and newspaper was used as insulation and soup can lids to cover holes; consequently, constantly telling myself 'it is what it is' and must admit one heck of an improvement inside and out. Again, thank to all for the input!!

.

 
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11-27-13, 04:53 PM   #6  
Appreciate the offer; looking at applying the 'knock down' method; watched an online video and appears fairly simple where it's a matter of spraying the texture on, wait a few, then slide a trowel across to knock off the edges?? Again, thank you!!

 
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11-28-13, 04:52 AM   #7  
Of all the different textures, knock down is my favorite. The walls in my house are slick finished but I applied knock down to the ceilings. Basically you spray a splatter coat [with a hopper] on the walls/ceiling and then knock down the 'bumps' with a wide knife. How thick/thin you mix the j/c and how long you let the splatter coat set before you knock it down both play a part in how heavy/light the texture will be.

While texture will make minor defects in the finish less noticeable - it should not be relied on to hide imperfections! If you see problems with the finishing, it's best to fix those prior to texture. That said, minor imperfections on the walls won't be all that noticeable once the room is put back together along with drapes, pictures and furniture in place.


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11-28-13, 10:43 AM   #8  
May not need the texture gun although kinda like the idea of textured ceiling and leaving the walls plain? Have access to Wagner airless texture gun, or the type that requires an air compressor, seems the Wagner airless would be the better choice where I don't have to deal with finding the optimum air pressure?? Saved several pieces of scrap drywall to practice on and from what I could gather, finding the correct texture mixture, and the length of time between application and knockdown pretty much determines how well it turns out. So far don't see anything major but won't know until ceilings and walls are sanded, noticed I certainly could have don't better job applying the tape to corner and edges, the seams came out find. Anyhow, again, appreciate suggestions!!.

 
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11-28-13, 01:37 PM   #9  
I know with the right tip, you can spray orange peel texture with an airless but I don't think they will spray heavier textures like what you'd use with knockdown .... but I don't know for sure
The consistency of the j/c determines if the knockdown will be heavy or light [thick or thin] How long you wait to knock it down determines how flat it will make it. The main thing is to use the same thickness of j/c and the same approximate wait time throughout the entire house - so it's all similar.

Not having seen it I don't know what the issues are with your corners but generally adding mud and sanding will fix it. If there are any bubbles in the tape - they need to be cut out, more mud won't fix that.


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11-28-13, 02:21 PM   #10  
Might as well borrow both texture guns and see which I prefer. There were 3 wooden beams on the ceiling and 1 on each corner of the room running the length so I decided to box each with drywall and consequently ended up with taping many corners and edges. I will apply another coat to those areas and see if able to clean them up, thank you for the information.

 
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11-28-13, 04:56 PM   #11  
Using a corner bead on the outside edges of the boxed beams will allow you to easily blend that edge into the corner. Do one side of an inside corner at a time, otherwise you will drag your knife through the fresh mud on the opposite side.

Orange peel will be the most forgiving as you are actually just spitting thinned down joint compound on the wall. You don't have to worry about wait times, drag marks etc. If the texture is too light, you simply spit some more on. It also lets you know if your compound is too thick or thin based on how it sprays. Too thick and it globs, too thin and it mists. I have a gravity feed hopper (for touch up and repairs) and a pump/air compressor combo for larger jobs. You can rent these to make life easier. I bought mine as the cost of renting would have been greater than the price new for a commercial job I did several years ago.

 
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11-29-13, 01:44 AM   #12  
Can I go back and use metal corner bead on the ceiling beam corner and edges if already applied joint compound to the paper tape; perhaps if I sand the surfaces beforehand???

 
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11-29-13, 03:30 AM   #13  
You can install the corner bead at any time, it get's nailed to the framing lumber. Installing it this late in the game just means that you'll have to do some extra mud work. While I've seen a few outside corners finished with tape - it's not something I'd want to do. The corner bead will make it a LOT easier to finish the corner nicely. It also helps to protect the corner from damage, not that it's a big concern on a ceiling. You don't cover the very edge of the corner bead with mud. It's used as a guide for your knife when you apply the j/c. Primer/paint will cover the little bit of exposed metal.

Depending on how bad the mud job is - it might be better to pull off the tape/mud and start fresh on the outside corners.


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11-29-13, 04:38 AM   #14  
I would be inclined to remove the tape and start fresh with the corner bead, however, not seeing your first attempt, only you can tell which would be best in your circumstance. You want to do your best to set the opposing beads on each side of the beam level to one another so the beam looks square. Corner beads are intentionally bent to a angle of less than 90 degrees. This allows the corner to protrude slightly so that a thin coat of mud covers the balance of the metal of the corner bead. If your corners are currently covered with so much mud that it causes you to flex the bead wider than 90 degrees to nail up, you need to back off on your previous work. It is a bear to feather a corner bead larger than 90 degrees and if so, might have been better to stay were you were.

 
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11-29-13, 08:44 AM   #15  
Intend focusing on the ceiling edges and corners after lightly sanded to determine which, if any, need to be replaced. Probly not the best time of year to be installing drywall, and painting; maintaining room temp., and with high humidity may be contributing to my problem; having said that, my goal is to have this on going remodel completed by spring, 'it is what it is'. Thanks to all for the help I really appreciate it!!.

 
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