Blueboard / Plasterboard

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  #1  
Old 11-30-13, 07:36 PM
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Blueboard / Plasterboard

Hi Folks,

What widely available gypsum board to folks use these days for a plaster base? None of the big box stores seem to carry the Imperial or Kal-Kore stuff. I've read that people just use the backside of pretty much any gypsum board, apply a bonding agent and they're off and running?

Also, will Weld-crete work just as well as Plaster-weld? I'm just asking because I have some Weld-crete on-hand.

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 12-01-13, 04:41 AM
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I'm not well versed in plaster but you should be able to find blueboard at any drywall supply house [look in the yellow pages] Big box stores usually don't carry building materials that don't have a big market.
 
  #3  
Old 12-01-13, 05:25 PM
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It,s about suction. Ordinary rock has little suction. Blueboard has suction. Either plaster weld or weld Crete kill suction so there is non advantage to using the back side of rock. I wondered the same thing about plaster self vs weld Crete so. So I called Larsen,s products. weld Crete will work for plaster for interior applications but Plasterweld will not work for exterior applications. So yes, you can use the weld Crete. If you are intending to use veneer plaster you will have better luck if you use a two coat system over bonding agent. Look for Blueboard at a supplier and forget the back side and bonding agent if you can find the real thing.
 
  #4  
Old 12-01-13, 07:43 PM
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Thanks guys, that's all very helpful. I think I found a place pretty close to me that should have pretty much whatever type of gypsum board I need. Yep, googling for "drywall supplies" did the trick.

And I was reading some of the specs at the USG website and it looked like they were recommending a two coat system so I've been looking at the "Diamond Veneer" stuff at USG trying to figure out what will work best for me. Which pretty much boils down to whats easiest for a rookie to work with when trying to get a smooth finish. Any thoughts?

I know it's not easy, I've already been practicing, took some old gypsum board I've had in the garage, making some angles (because that's what I'll be working on), taping and plastering away. I've been working with some California One-Kote, thought I'd be using that since it's easy to find here, but yeh, I think a two coat is probably a much better idea.

Thanks!
 
  #5  
Old 12-02-13, 02:47 PM
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One does not have to know a lot to plaster but it takes a lot of practice. If you use a one coat system you can use Diamond finish over the blueboard or if you can't get Diamond use Un- Kal. They both trowel down to a nice smooth, shiny finish if you trowel enough at just the right time.
If you use a base coat use Imperial base coat or Gold-Bond's brand Kal0Kote Base.

There are other finishes you can use as well
Imperial Finish
Kal-Kote Finish
X-Kaliber

I think a two coat system is a little more amateur friendly because you will have a bit of tooth to put the finish on and the suction is about right. You do however have two chances to mess up instead of one if you use a tow coat system
The main thing to remember is to lay down the base coat really flat.
Also don't make the finish coat too thick and work quickly on the finish to get it on and doubled before it sets. When you are troweling the finish smooth keep the trowel clean and keep it lubricated with water. Trowel it right through the setting process and don't waste the fat. Yes, you have to strike a balance between a clean trowel and keeping the fat to fill in imperfections.
 
  #6  
Old 12-02-13, 04:08 PM
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Thanks, yep, I ended up with Kal-kore plaster board, Imperial base and Diamond finish. They didn't have any Diamond base. I was hoping to use Diamond because it looks like it doesn't setup as quickly and might be a bit easier to work with.

Haha, yeh, you're right... I must be real optimistic for some reason. I was thinking 2 coats give me more wiggle room for getting it right, but yeh, if the base is screwed up I'm probably not going to be able to fix it with the finish coat.

Have to try out the Imperial / Diamond tomorrow and see how it goes. It will be different than working with the One-Kote stuff, have to try and get a handle on when I should be doing what to the plaster, seems tricky to judge when it's setup enough to really start smoothing things out, etc.

But I've got plenty of old drywall to play with, and it's pretty fun stuff.

Thanks!
 
  #7  
Old 01-01-14, 08:17 AM
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"if you trowel enough at just the right time"

So this seems to be a really major points. Yep, still practicing, trying not to rush and I'm busy with other stuff. In general my trowel work has gotten better, still playing around with getting the right mix, but the two biggest challenges I'm having are 1) how & when to trowel and 2) dealing with some bullnose edges.

I don't know if anyone has any good tips on the how & when? I think that a lot of that really comes from experience since the times will vary. I'm still fighting the impulse to trowel too much too soon, still trying to avoid just scraping off the plaster that I just applied, but getting a better handle on that. I guess I mostly just have to keep doing it, but the tough part is fighting the fear that I'm letting things set up too much before troweling - although everything points to the opposite.

All the pointers that tightcoat shared have been spot on, it's just still tough for me to figure out what type of troweling to do at what time.

And finishing the bullnose bead properly, smoothly is pretty tricky. But I think that may have a lot to do with my what & when also.

So if anyone has any additional pointers... I see now how tough some of this stuff is to describe. I think I've just about exhausted the youtube videos, USG literature, what I could find on the forums (seems like plastering is a much more active skill in the UK these days). But some little things like "once the basecoat starts to brownout" make sense now and are helpful - and the same for pretty much all of tightcoats tips. I'm not wondering what the heck "the fat" is anymore or why it's so important to keep the trowel clean.
 
  #8  
Old 01-12-14, 05:28 PM
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Mikal, I don't think anyone has mentioned it but having help could be a good thing, especially if you are planning on doing an area of any size.

Trying to mix material and keep your own hawk supplied and trowel the material can be a tedious and wasteful use of your time and end up making the difference between a decent job and a disaster. You will find this especially true when applying the finish coat and time is critical. The assistant doesn't have to apply material but having those two extra hands will more than double the production as long as he/she is staying ahead of you in the process.

Another point of concern would be the amount of time you allow the base coat to dry. With veneer basecoat I would even consider applying it in the morning and doing the finish coat in the afternoon.

If you have trouble with too fast a setting time on either the base or finish you could add "retarder" to the mix which will help lengthen the working time.

One last consideration for now....make sure your base and finish materials are relatively fresh stock, preferably 6 months or fresher.
 
  #9  
Old 01-13-14, 06:59 PM
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As little retarder goes a long way. A teaspoonful in a bucket of either finish or basecoat is a lot. Add the retarder to the mixing water before you start the batch. You can't take the retarder out so use it with great care. Start with a little and use more in the next batch if you need more time.
Also, dirty water or mixing containers will cause a faster set. That is. Good reason for help. While you are putting the material on the wall the helper can get the mixing paddle and container clean and ready for the next batch. It is best not to mix batches, that is a new batch with an old batch.
 
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