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Repairing drywall after removing wallpaper

Repairing drywall after removing wallpaper

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  #1  
Old 01-17-14, 07:48 PM
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Repairing drywall after removing wallpaper

I have been recently working on removing the wallpaper in my bathroom. The previous homeowner had the bright idea of painting over the wallpaper, so that made it even harder to remove. The worst part of all, no one primed the walls before hanging the drywall. So I was stuck removing wallpaper from bare drywall, and in the process it ripped the paper off of the drywall itself exposing the brown fuzzy layer.

I know that I am going to have skim coat all of the walls, but before I do that I need to address the areas where the paper from the drywall has been ripped. I have read that I need apply Zissner Garz to the walls to seal the exposed areas of the drywall before skimming.

My question is, do I need to sand off the fuzzy stuff and try to level out the damaged areas on the walls before applying Gardz? Or do I need to sand after applying Gardz?

Also, what kind of grit sand papers should I be using to smooth out the fuzzy areas, and the rest of the walls before skimming?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-18-14, 03:29 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'd probably give it a quick sand with 120 grit prior to applying the Gardz [an oil base primer will also work but these are the only 2 primers that will work] No need to get it nice and smooth at this point. Another quick sand after the primer is dry will make it ready for the joint compound.
 
  #3  
Old 01-18-14, 04:57 AM
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You did a pretty good job of scraping. When I did mine I just filled in any gouges with patch and painted over it. No sealer used and I'v had no ill affects.
 
  #4  
Old 01-18-14, 05:02 AM
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The problem you can run into if you don't seal the exposed gypsum is water can further degrade the gypsum and making the remaining paper lift around the edges. Sometimes the water in latex primer/paint or j/c is enough to cause problems .... and sometimes you get lucky. IMO it's better to oil prime [or Gardz] and play it safe
 
  #5  
Old 01-18-14, 07:49 AM
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Its the lifting paper that is the problem. Looks find until the paint dries and you notice a bubble. The walls will require a skim coat, so not real need to sand other than remove excess paste. If after sealing and priming and painting you still have bubbles, I cut the bubble out in the shape of a football and skim over that spot with setting type compound. Don't let the bubbles overly frustrate you, your biggest aggravation is over, that being removing the drywall.
 
  #6  
Old 01-18-14, 10:40 AM
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your biggest aggravation is over, that being removing the drywall.
I'm sure Z meant removing the wallpaper

Every now and then you get to remove wallpaper that comes of easily but most times it makes you fight for every inch and swear you'll never use wallpaper .... or maybe it just makes you swear
 
  #7  
Old 01-18-14, 11:30 AM
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I'm sure Z meant removing the wallpaper
Funny, Just checkin' to see if anyone reads my posts....

I've been called in as the clean up committee several times on similar and the easiest solution was in fact to replace the drywall.

I once recommended to a client that he paint over the wallpaper as it was stuck hard and not coming off. Told him I would skim any visible seam before he put on the final coat. Well...he spoke with his brother...who said I was nuts...so he removed the wallpaper...along with 80% of the paper on the drywall!!! No possible salvage Ended up having to replace all the drywall.

I asked him if his brother did this for a living? and why he would take his advise over mine? No answer - but it cost him dearly as we had to do a complete tear out. Once the paper is compromised to that extent, it changes the properties of the drywall and it has zero strength.
 
  #8  
Old 01-19-14, 03:26 PM
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I have been unable to find Gardz at Home Depot and Lowes. I am going to check Sherwin Williams tomorrow. If I can't find it, will any oil based primer work? Or should I use a specific brand?

Once I have the primer on, and get ready to skim, will the sheetrock green top join compound work fine? I have read that I should mix it to pancake batter consistency. Can I just roll it on the walls with a 1/2" nap roller and smooth it with a trowel?
 
  #9  
Old 01-20-14, 02:51 AM
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Any oil primer should do fine although a fast dry interior primer would be better than a slow drying exterior primer. Oil base Kilz is probably the least expensive primer that will work. I've almost always used an oil primer - mostly because I've always had some handy.

I'm not sure thinning and rolling on j/c will work well with your walls, that's more for tweaking decent walls to achieve an ultra fine finish ..... or texturing. I generally thin the mud a little and then apply it with a 10" or 12" drywall knife. You want it loose enough where it slides well but stiffen enough where it adheres and doesn't slide down the wall. There are those that prefer a hawk and trowel but I learned with a knife and mud pan.
 
  #10  
Old 01-22-14, 05:46 PM
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I stopped into Sherwin Williams and picked up a gallon of Oil Based Pro Block Primer. This weened I am going to start sanding and then prime. With the green lid Sheetrock joint compound, will it be fine to just apply it straight out of the bucket with a trowel without thinning it?
 
  #11  
Old 01-23-14, 05:30 AM
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While you can apply the j/c straight out of the bucket, it will flow a little easier if you thin it slightly. IMO thinning it slightly makes it easier to do a nice job. I've never used a trowel with j/c as I learned with and have always used drywall knife and mud pan ..... but there are many who prefer a hawk and trowel. You don't need to apply the mud any thicker than needed to just even out the wall.
 
  #12  
Old 01-23-14, 06:30 PM
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Thanks for the help so far everyone.

I do have a coupe other questions. I have a fiberglass tub and shower combo, and whoever installed it used paper joint tape to cover the seams between the shower unit and drywall. When I was removing the wallpaper, some of the paper tape came off, so I just went ahead and ripped the rest of it out. How should I repair this the proper way? Will fiberglass tape and mud be fine, or is there a specific tape that should be used in these applications?

When removing the tape, I also managed to put a small hole in the drywall next to the corner. Can I fix this by using a mesh screen and mudding?

I have attached a couple pictures of what I am working with
 
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  #13  
Old 01-24-14, 02:44 AM
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Paper tape has a better track record than the 'sticky' [mesh] tape. Was the tub installed on the outside of the drywall If it is, I'd go back with paper tape. Mud alone should be ok to repair the damage in the corner.
 
  #14  
Old 01-31-14, 05:38 PM
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I almost looks like laid over it, but it's not. Looking at it closer I think that it was filled with hot mud in places. After that, paper tape was laid over the over the flange seam edge and drywall , then the wall paper was put up. Either way, I am no expert, but it seems like a shoddy install.

I am going to get some of the setting type join compound and mix to fill in any gaps. Marksr, wouldn't a vinyl mesh tape be better in the application due to moisture resistance?


I attached a picture of the shower unit and drywall. I was planning on applying joint compound down to where the red line is. Even if I prime and paint, will the moisture from the bathroom ever deteriorate or weaken the material? I have a feeling water might get up there and rest. Other than installing tile, is there any kind of protective edging I should apply where 45 degree is where the mud and fiberglass shower meet? Will caulking be sufficient?
 
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  #15  
Old 02-01-14, 04:26 AM
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Primer and latex enamel gives the drywall and j/c although moisture protection it should need. Once the drywall is finished/sanded, primed and the lip of the tub surround cleaned you'd caulk where the tub and drywall meet. Assuming no structural issues that will give you years of trouble free service.

Paper tape almost always out preforms 'sticky' tape. The mesh tape is prone to come loose later on and it also doesn't always stay laying flat resulting in wrinkles in the wall and failure of the paint applied to it. Setting compounds help to lock down the 'sticky' tape but paper tape is still better. The primer and enamel stop moisture from the shower getting to the j/c, tape or drywall. Caulking the joint prevents moisture from being wicked up from the bottom.
 
  #16  
Old 02-09-14, 07:57 PM
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Ok, I finally got everything sanded and ready to go except for patching a coupe holes, installing a new paper corner bead, and taping around the shower unit. In the process of sanding I have exposed a few areas of the paper seam tape. Who ever did it previously did not mud over it much at all, and that's probably why wallpaper was used in the first place. I have attached a picture.

Should I go ahead and prime the walls with the oil based primer next? Or do I need to make the taping repairs around the shower unit, install the corner bead, patch the holes, and mud over the exposed tape before priming?

Basically, I am not for sure where I should start next, and what steps I should take following. Any help will be appreciated.
 
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  #17  
Old 02-10-14, 04:24 AM
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You'll need to float more j/c over a wider area to better cover the exposed tape.
 
  #18  
Old 02-10-14, 06:03 PM
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So put more mud over the tape first, then prime over it when done?

What about the paper corner bead? Do I need to mud that in place before priming?

To fill in the low areas on the walls, should I prime first then skim and fill? Or do the opposite?


I don't know what process I should do, and in what steps.
 
  #19  
Old 02-11-14, 03:27 AM
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Usually the only time you need to prime first is when you have damaged drywall [missing paper, exposed gypsum] or if adhesion is expected to be an issue.
Normally all the screws/nails and tape get 3 coats of mud. Exactly what do you mean by paper corner bead? Normal corner bead [for outside corners] is either metal or plastic and is nailed in place. There is corner bead that has paper edges [and is installed with mud, just like drywall tape] with a metal corner impregnated in it but usually it's just used for off angles.
 
  #20  
Old 02-11-14, 07:14 PM
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The walls were damaged somewhat during wallpaper removal, as you can see if the original pictures a lot of the white paper was removed exposing the brown fuzzy layer.

On one of the inside corners of the wall, I think the original builders used paper joint tape to fill the corner seams. During the wallpaper removal it was damaged and removed. So I bought an inner corner bead that has a small metal strip with paper edges to replace with.


I am going to return my original primer, and get some of the Zinsser Gardz. I want to make sure it's done right the first time, and that I don't have to worry about missed glue coming through. I have noticed that there are a couple different versions of Gardz. One version is called Gardz High Performance Sealer, model number 2301. The other version that I see is called Gardz Problem Surface Sealer. Which version should I use for these walls?

My intentions as it sits, is to prime the walls with Gardz, skim coat and level out, reapply Gardz, and then use a latex primer and panit
 
  #21  
Old 02-12-14, 03:52 AM
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I didn't know there were 2 different Gardz primers The problem surface sealer is what I'd use although I suspect either one will work. While it doesn't hurt, it isn't necessary to prime the skim coat with Gardz. It will seal the wall better than most latex primers but it doesn't have much coverage properties.

Folded paper tape is the industry standard for inside corners.
 
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