Advice on outside corner repair

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Old 05-03-14, 03:14 PM
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Advice on outside corner repair

Greetings. I have two outside corner areas that are in need of repair. I've identified them as area 1 and 2 on the first picture and then zoomed in for a closer look on the other pictures. In area 2 I can push the cracked part with my finger to make it become level again but when I let go it moves back. I don't have a good feeling about any of this. Looking forward to your suggestions. Thank you!

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Old 05-03-14, 04:29 PM
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You didn't say how old the house is but this could be related to a few different things.

First, it does not appear there are any nails or screws in the corner bead.

Secondly, it may be that the framing lumber in the areas of your problem has shrunk, a somewhat natural occurrence with solid lumber and it can also happen in engineered lumber as well.

The issue speaks of poor workmanship but it really is only cosmetic. If you feel more comfortable removing the bead you can certainly do that and install a new one...nailed or screwed into place. You can also chip off the existing compound and provide nails or screws for that one.

I see some mesh tape over the bead in one picture. If you pull that off and sand or chip away the compound down to the drywall then you can also tape over the bead and onto the face of the drywall. You should use a hard setting compound for the first coat on the bead and applying the tape. You can then follow up with premixed compound or EZ sand setting type compound.
 
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Old 05-03-14, 04:44 PM
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Thanks. The house was built in 1991. We've been here for around eight years and the problem was there when we moved in. I (actually my wife) would like to paint which is why I'm looking at repairing the issues at this time.

Everything stated by Calvert makes sense to me except for one thing. There doesn't seem to be anything solid behind the corner bead in area 2 for me to screw or nail it back into position. I drilled a small random test hole through the corner bead in area 2 and hit air and then eventually some drywall - no stud. I have no knowledge of construction and don't know if this is normal or not. The issue is that based on that one test hole I don't have any confidence I can fasten the wiggly corner bead in area 2 back into place. Should I drill more test holes until I find a stud? Other actions I should take? Thanks again.
 
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Old 05-03-14, 05:18 PM
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I would guess they missed the stud and left it that way. Just taped over it. I would guess you will have to remove a section of dry wall and install a 2 X 4 to have something to hang the wall board from. Area 2 , Area one looks like you should be able to re mud it after removing loose stuff.
 
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Old 05-03-14, 05:37 PM
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Difficult to predict what framers might do. Did you drill across the entire width of the bead?

If you don't want to cut into the issue to install wood you may be able to make it work with a mud on type bead. Check with a drywall contractor or supply yard and ask what may be available in your area.
 
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Old 05-04-14, 04:14 AM
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There should be wood all along the corner, might try a few more spots. Some hangers like to use a crimper [instead of nails] to install the corner bead - I don't like them because they don't secure the corner bead good enough.

After the corner bead is secure you'll need to apply a couple of coats of mud. Once the mud work is done you'll need to texture the repair to help make it disappear. It looks like an orange peel texture which can be replicated with thinned down joint compound, you can also buy aerosol cans of orange peel texture.
 
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Old 05-04-14, 12:52 PM
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Good news - I drilled another test hole as suggested and found a stud. Another test hole, another stud. I was just unlucky in my first attempt.

With confidence I could fasten the sagging corner bead I chipped away all the loose mud. I could now see that the corner bead was only fastened with nails at the ends. I installed several drywall screws all along the corner bead so that it was no longer sagging but nice and tight against the ceiling (see picture). I've since applied a coat of joint compound and after it dries will apply one or two more. I may try the spray on texture at the end, thanks for the tip. I appreciate everyone's advice, it was very helpful. Thank you!!

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Old 05-04-14, 04:56 PM
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posted in error

Posted in error please ignore/delete
 
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Old 05-05-14, 04:17 AM
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Glad you found the framing

I forgot to mention earlier but make sure you cover everything up well when you spray the texture! It has a habit of going everywhere It is water soluble but it's a lot easier to cover stuff up than it is to clean it up afterwards

The aerosol texture can has an adjustable tip, you might have to dial it in to get the right texture consistency to match what you have.
 
 

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