Which edge of DW to use?

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  #1  
Old 05-08-14, 09:13 AM
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Which edge of DW to use?

When butting drywall in corners, or at door jams which edge do you use? The cut edge or the tapered edge. Is there ever a time you butt non-like edges - for taping reasons. Also, do you bring the drywall all the way out to the jack stud of a door jam?
 
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Old 05-08-14, 09:34 AM
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It doesn't matter too much on an inside corners. At door/window openings a cut edge is better solely because it allows the casing to set better on the wall. The drywall can come all the way to the edge of the stud as long as it doesn't come past [it's easy to trim off the excess] When you do have a taper edge and square edge together it's best to prefill the taper before you tape.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 09:43 AM
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Hey thanks marksr. Perfect answers. Now I know. What about outside corners? Best practice?
 
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Old 05-08-14, 10:02 AM
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It doesn't matter too much but works best if both sides of the outside corner are the same, that way the corner bead doesn't lay crooked.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 10:45 AM
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One more question - because I'm curious of your take. Install DW vertically (parallel the studs) or horizontally? Opinions seems to be split 50-50, but many experts say horizontally. Since I have 91" high basement walls I'm doing my first layer vertically. 2nd layer (only in my media room) will be horizontal.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 01:59 PM
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When you hang drywall horizontally it's easier to finish [less bending over] and it helps to minimize any discrepancies in the framing. About the only time I'll hang drywall vertically is when it's a short section of wall where I can eliminate the seam.

You can buy 52" wide drywall if you wish to go that route.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 02:08 PM
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Horizontally is the current convention, vertically is no longer the norm.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 02:29 PM
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I'd didn't know vertical was ever the norm even though I see it a lot on TV and with diyers. I've been painting new residential homes on and off for 40 yrs and never saw one that had the drywall hung vertically.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 02:38 PM
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My parents house was built in 1966 and the drywall is hung vertically. My house was built in 2001 and it's hung horizontally.

I think in addition to being a little easier to mud and tape, it makes a little stronger wall since the sheet spans more studs this way.
 
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Old 05-09-14, 12:46 AM
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Absolutely no question that hanging the drywall horizontally makes for easier taping but sometimes hanging it vertically makes for easier hanging at the expense of the taping. Case in point, I had to rebuild a wall between my hall and my "project" room. On the hall side I hung the drywall horizontally but found it near impossible (working alone) to get a tight joint between the wall and the ceiling. Now I need to fill this 1/2 inch gap and I will probably work off of a rolling stage to do it. Taping the waist-high horizontal join however was a breeze. On the room side I opted to install vertically even though it meant many vertical joints to tape because I could easily set a block under the vertical drywall to butt it up against the ceiling.

As for the inside corner, I advocate cutting the drywall in half, either vertically or horizontally as applicable and placing the cut edges into the corner. This makes for a much easier (for me, anyway) taping of the corner without having to fill the taper. Subsequent joints, either vertical or horizontal will then be two tapered edges which are far easier for me to tape than a tapered and a butt.

Truth is, I detest drywall work and I will do everything in my power to make it easier.
 
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Old 05-09-14, 03:46 AM
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but found it near impossible (working alone) to get a tight joint between the wall and the ceiling.
The top piece of drywall should be hung first so you can push it up tight to the ceiling. If there are any gaps, let them be at the bottom where the baseboard will hide it. Having a gap at the bottom also makes it harder for the drywall to wick up any water from spills/leaks. If you set some nails in the drywall before you go to hang it, you can lift the board in place and knock those nails in to hold the drywall so you can go back and screw it.
 
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Old 05-09-14, 05:54 PM
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Yes, Mark, I know that. But working alone, holding a 4x8 sheet of drywall horizontally up against the ceiling and then nailing or screwing it into place is pretty much impossible for me. Running the panels vertically allowed me to place a small block of the correct thickness (or use a lever operated by my foot) to force the panels up against the ceiling.
 
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