Filling plaster joints?

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  #1  
Old 06-11-14, 08:24 AM
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Filling plaster joints?

The walls in my house are plaster on sheetrock - about 7/8" to 1" thick.

I cut out a 12" high x 16" wide section (stud center to stud center) to gain access to the sole plate.

Now it's time to replace the piece (actually now two pieces because it broke along the sheetrock joint).

In order to fill the joint where I made the cut, is there a product and/or procedure that won't develop a crack in the future?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-11-14, 09:42 AM
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I'd replace it like a normal drywall patch using paper tape. I like to use a setting compound like Durabond for plaster repairs as it dries hard like the plaster but is easier to use than plaster.
 
  #3  
Old 06-11-14, 10:16 AM
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Hi marksr, thanks for your reply.

I know paper tape would work but I'd rather have the small cracks that I suspect that would appear than to have the large area of feathering required to use the tape. (Unless you're suggesting to scrape off the skim coat to embed the tape - which would be a lot of work)

The wall now has that subtle texture created by several coats of paint applied with a roller and feathering new work would leave a "flat" looking or smooth effect that would stand out among the texture. Even painting over it once with a roller, I believe the feathered area would still be noticeable.

I was hoping there was some new "magic" product like a painter's caulk that was flexible (hence no cracking) and could be worked to a finish to somewhat blend/match with the surrounding surface.

My experience with painter's caulk is even when applied with a wet finger will still look like an ugly caulk joint - but after all, I'm not good at creating good looking caulk joints.

Any other suggestions?
 
  #4  
Old 06-11-14, 12:34 PM
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I'd scrape a little of the plaster off and use tape. Setting compounds aren't as prone to cracking as regular joint compound but it's still likely to crack since you are installing a new piece of drywall. You can thin down j/c to about paint consistency and roll it on to mimic multiple coats of paint.

Generally houses with a plaster veneer are some of the finer homes, no sense in making a cheap looking repair!
 
  #5  
Old 06-11-14, 08:46 PM
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What marksr said. There are a lot of posts here about how to do what you are doing. You might want to shim the sheetrock out a bit so it takes less mud but what ever you do keep it just a little shy. A sharp paint scraper should scrape the finish off of the base coat in about five minutes. Yes it is hard work. Scrape it then reward yourself with a drink of your choice. It sounds like you only have to scrape three sides.
 
  #6  
Old 06-11-14, 08:51 PM
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I am not using drywall. I am replacing the plaster piece I cut out.
 
  #7  
Old 06-12-14, 02:46 AM
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It's a plaster veneer of drywall, right? I'd still tape the joint! either scrape both sides of the joint or plan on feathering the repair out further.
 
  #8  
Old 06-12-14, 09:01 PM
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The thickness would indicate it is gypsum plaster on gypsum lath. It resembles drywall but is different. Anyway install nailers like a 1x2 or better a 2x2. For a wider target and install as plywood nailer at the top ( and bottom). Screw the piece back in the hole and when it is solid scrape the finish only off the joint a little wider than joint tape and then tape and finish and texture if needed and prime and paint.
 
  #9  
Old 06-12-14, 09:11 PM
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Okay I'll give that a try.

Which type of tape is best and does the tape come in more than one width?
 
  #10  
Old 06-12-14, 09:13 PM
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I like FibraFuse or maybe it is FibaFuse. If you don't find that use paper.
 
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