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Damaged sheetrock - what would a pro do here?

Damaged sheetrock - what would a pro do here?

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  #1  
Old 08-20-14, 04:51 AM
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Damaged sheetrock - what would a pro do here?

I pulled wainscoting off the lower walls. Some sheetrock was damaged. Also have heavy vinyl wallpaper above which seems to be coming off ok. Would anyone cut off the section of sheetrock that was damaged by wainscoting removal or is there a way to repair it? Pics attached. Thank you!!!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-20-14, 05:58 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

There are 2 ways to handle, you'll need to figure which one is the most cost/time effective for you
I'd probably repair what you have.

You can rip out the damaged drywall and replace it or remove any loose paper [it's often helpful to cut it along the edges to prevent peeling it all off], coat all the exposed gypsum with either an oil base primer or Zinnser's Gardz [prevents the moisture in latex paint or j/c from dissolving the gypsum or lifting the paper], apply joint compound as needed, sand, prime and paint.
 
  #3  
Old 08-20-14, 07:03 AM
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What Mark said and I also would probably repair what you have instead of replacing.
 
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Old 08-20-14, 07:39 AM
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Thank you guys. The forum raises the confidence of inexperienced people... that is good!
 
  #5  
Old 08-20-14, 09:37 AM
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Zinnser's Gardz [prevents the moisture in latex paint or j/c from dissolving the gypsum or lifting the paper]
Mark,
I have heard local pros say good things about this Gardz. Have you ever used this over glossy paint, with no other prep work??
Or would that be ill advised??
Is there any easy way to mud over gloss or semi-gloss?

Thanks
 
  #6  
Old 08-20-14, 09:43 AM
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I always sand gloss or semi-gloss to rough it up before painting over it.

I've only used Gardz over exposed gypsum, as it's so thin I don't really like working with it.
 
  #7  
Old 08-20-14, 11:43 AM
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Ya, the only reason to use Gardz is when you have to either seal exposed gypsum or wallpaper adhesive. Oil base primer was the norm for this until Zinnser came out with Gradz. I usually use oil primer because I normally have it on hand. As Mitch stated, it's best to sand glossy paints before recoating and use an oil base primer if switching from oil enamel to latex.

While I don't think I've ever skim coated over a gloss enamel, I have scuff sanded and patched over enamels with no issues.
 
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