Texture vs Non T

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  #1  
Old 10-19-14, 12:33 PM
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Texture vs Non T

In final stage of completing living room and faced w/ a dilemma of whether to texture the walls or leave them plain before painting. I would prefer to leave the walls plain, especially considering the one room I did texture came out pathetic. Having said that, the walls are marginal, not flawless yet not bad enough, in my view, to texture. My question, if I were to use a heavy nap; perhaps, 3/4" rough nap might cover minor flaws??? Comments appreciated!
 
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  #2  
Old 10-19-14, 01:49 PM
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It is not usually done this way but you can prime it, take a Look at it and then decide whether to put on the paint or texture.
The flatter the paint he more flaterring it is to a marginal finishing job.
 
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Old 10-19-14, 03:14 PM
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Failed to mention; after taping, compound, and sanding I applied a couple coats of primer to the walls; however, then decided to install a new ceiling and in the process added a few nicks and gouges to the walls. I have since found primed walls do not sand well and although I tried to use caution there are area's where the primer peeled. I have been attempting to apply a thin coat of compound and lightly sanding but finding there are a few areas with a slight variations, approx. the thickness of a coat or 2 of primer. Intend working little more on these area's but not sure if advisable to add yet another, or 3rd coat of primer, or apply the paint which includes primer and see how the walls turn out???

Thank you for the prompt response, it's appreciated!!
 
  #4  
Old 10-19-14, 03:31 PM
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Latex primer never sands real good. It's commonplace to apply a thin layer of mud over primer to fix bad spots. I would not rely on the primer part of primer in the paint to do much! IMO it's more a marketing ploy than anything else - painted walls rarely need primer and the repaint customer is their marketing focus.

If the wall needs a lot of help, I'd skim coat it, sand, then prime. Otherwise spot touch ups are fine. If you view the wall at an angle [a bright light can be helpful] you can usually spot the defects. They will also be easily seen while the primer is still wet. Paint will not hide defects in the finish but as TC said, flat paints are more forgiving than enamels.
 
  #5  
Old 10-19-14, 04:18 PM
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Thank you for the input!! I have applied a thin coat of mud then lightly sanded to effected area and today focused on a few spots. The great majority of all 4 walls appear fine. Likely spend a few hours tomorrow and then 'it is what it is' and if I understand correctly I can add another coat of primer to get a better indication of how the wall may look before painting. I don't believe another coat is necessary for the entire room. Been fortunate, however, humidity is beginning to run mid 80's and me be thinking not the best conditions for painting??

Again, thank to all!!!
 
  #6  
Old 10-20-14, 03:50 AM
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Humidity will slow down the drying time but shouldn't be an issue. I used to paint new construction in fla where the humidity rarely dips below 80% All the new j/c should be primed, spot priming is fine although sometimes it makes more sense to do the whole wall.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 09:52 AM
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Imagine with high humidity, and possible rain, it's a matter of knowing how long to wait before peeling the masking tape off, figure I will remove as soon after applying the paint??

Gave the room a going over, and with everyone's input, I have narrowed it down to a couple of small area's that require a little more attention so rather than rush the project decided to hold off an extra day, overall I am 'kinda' confident I will be able to go with non-textured walls.

Can't thank everyone enough for the suggestions and input!!
 
  #8  
Old 10-20-14, 09:59 AM
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If you use tape, you have two choices:
1. Remove it right away while the paint is still wet
2. Use a knife to cut the junction between the tape and paint as you remove the tape to keep it from peeling paint off your wall along with the tape

Also, keep in mind that paint tends to amplify imperfections in walls rather than mask them, so if you're in doubt about whether something is good enough, it's best to assume it isn't.
 
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Old 10-20-14, 10:57 AM
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Faced w/ a dilemma, a badly texturing outcome, or few flaws on non textured walls. As mentioned, hopefully have better indication after applying coat of primer?? Been working on the living room walls for more time that I am willing to admit to, if I find the 1st coat of paint amplifies any imperfections then perhaps I can then break out the texture gun??
 
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Old 10-20-14, 10:58 AM
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You can still touch up a wall after it's been painted - sand and/or mud as appropriate to fix the flaw, then prime any mud and paint that area again.
 
  #11  
Old 10-20-14, 11:43 AM
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I'm not fond of using tape but if you do, it's best to remove it immediately. That way the glue is more apt to release from the substrate [no picking off small pieces of tape] and if any paint seeps under the tape you can remove it before it dries.

IMO texture is fairly easy to apply. What issues were you having with it?
 
  #12  
Old 10-20-14, 12:47 PM
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Used an electric texture gun and although I did practice after 1/4 of the room was done realized the heat from the motor clogged the nozzle and varied the texture. Also, experimented w/ viscosity and found even though I tried using the same mixture consistency the texture varied. Then there's the matter of how long to wait before using the 'knock down' texture method, soon found it best to let set a bit too long rather than not set long enough. Kinda feel I learned enough from that experience the next room should come out lot better, and to my eye it does not look all that bad, unless one were to look closely there are inconsistency in the texture and an occasional globular run?? Finally, if it were a bedroom, or perhaps bathroom not sure it would make that much difference to me?? Worse case scenario, if plain walls don't come out I should be able to then texture and/or purchase several hanging pictures. Intend starting on the short wall, it's the wall I prepared for the entertainment center, with large screen tv, cabinet and speakers not much wall to critique.

mitch17 in regards to touch up flaws after painting, unless the flaws are sooo pronounced it would require an complete redo that is probly what I will do. IMO, due to lack of experience believe I should have been more cautious in sanding the primed walls to prevent primer peeling, better yet, I should not have primed until I was ready to paint the wall; having said that, it is only in a few spots, if I can correct those area's I think the project should come out okay??

Again, thank you to all!!
 
  #13  
Old 10-20-14, 12:59 PM
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While I've used air powered texture hopper guns a lot, I've never used an electric texture gun. The electric motor getting the tip hot is definitely a drawback Knock down is probably one of the harder textures to get good at. An orange peel or even a splatter texture [what you have before you knock it down] is a lot easier to master.
 
  #14  
Old 10-20-14, 01:20 PM
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Originally purchased a less expensive (cheap) air texture gun and thought, at the time, it did not work so I gave it away, later learned it worked fine but by that time bought the electric. Now believe I could use either and the texture would turn out okay, matter of occasionally stopping to clear the nozzle and work with a thinner mixture than perhaps an air type texture gun.
 
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