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What is the correct way to patch around gang boxes?

What is the correct way to patch around gang boxes?


  #1  
Old 10-30-14, 06:28 AM
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What is the correct way to patch around gang boxes?

Due to projects, I now have three boxes in my bathroom that require drywalling.

Just because I'm so displeased with how it came about, I'll describe the issues;

Bathroom had one dim light in a light/vent fixture on the ceiling.
1) Added wall lighting above mirror by running a line from a receptacle back up and turning the one-gang receptacle into two-gang receptacle and switch for light. I had to cut above and below the gang box to remove it and install the two-gang. Thanks to lumber dimensions in 1880s, the gang box sticks out from the wall about 1/4 inch. Since I think I need to make the hole larger in order to patch anyway, I'll look into getting a wider box that isn't as deep.

2) Exhaust vent died on Sunday. Local store does not sell a replacement motor in correct size and I think the bathroom would be best served with a light/vent/heat unit anyway. The unit I bought is longer, but thinner, than what it replaced, so I have an opening there. I have other issues due to the fact that the manufacturer had two decent ways to install the unit; fixed brackets to studs on one side or sliding brackets. My stud is on the other side of the unit and the sliding brackets don't work because the ceiling is drywall glued to plaster and lath, so the dimensions are off.

3) Switch to the original unit was just one switch that turned on both the light and exhaust at same time. This single switch was in a two-gang box because the wires were originally a) 12/2 from breaker (via hall light), b) 12/2 to different hall light, c) 12/2 to kitchen light, d) 12/2 to bathroom light/fan. Rather crowded. After way too much time trying to get all of that to fit into my three-gang old work box, I gave up and rewired the attic so that the bathroom three-gang has just 12/2 from breaker (via hall lights) and 12/2/2 to light/vent/heat.

Phew. All of these areas have studs on one side and nothing else around them. My initial thought is to make the hole larger (uncovering half the studs) so I screw scrap wood or drywall behind the holes at the edges, screw the patch to the scrap and stud, and attach the old-work gang boxes to the correct width drywall. Ceiling will be done similarly by building a frame from a joist for the unit to attach to and allow drywall to secure to that.

Any better ideas?

NOTE. I have everything rewired. Turning on all lights and then vent and heat at the same time did not trip the breaker.
 
  #2  
Old 10-30-14, 06:31 AM
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Too much for me to read and understand this morning - can you post some pictures?
 
  #3  
Old 10-30-14, 07:33 AM
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Use drywall repair clips found at local box stores. You clip them onto the existing drywall, insert your patch, screw everything off, snap off the exposed clip then tape and mud. Works well for these types of strange circumstances.

Wal-Board Tools Drywall Repair Clip (6-Pack)-54-014 at The Home Depot
 
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Old 10-30-14, 07:49 AM
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@czizzi,

I saw those on ATOH. Thanks for reminding me. Any particular suggestion on mud/tape/whatever
 
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Old 10-30-14, 08:02 AM
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For a quicker repair, use a setting type joint compound that you mix from a powder. Use in small batches as it sets up quickly. Use a hair dryer once it begins to set if you want to move it along. Needs to dry white before sanding. If you use paper tape with setting compound, dip the paper in water and wring out first before setting in your first coat of mud. Setting type compounds will allow you to complete the project the same day. Regular joint compounds will need to dry overnight (evaporation) between coats which will drag this out over multiple days.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 08:15 AM
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I would add that the setting type compounds dry harder than the ready mix mud so it pays to apply it neatly [less sanding] I often use setting compound except for the final coat where I'll use the regular j/c.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 09:54 AM
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Thank you all very much. Additional words to meet requirements.
 
 

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