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4th drywall for my home studio needed...but how?


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11-16-14, 01:01 PM   #1  
4th drywall for my home studio needed...but how?

My drywalling installation person is taking too long to get back to me and I need to install a 4th drywall as indicated by the dotted line to cover the window area of my home studio ASAP. I am thinking of doing it my self but have little experience with drywalls. This installation uses steel frames

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The diagram shows what was done already. As you can see, the last drywall will cover the windows but with a small gap between window and the steel framing (it can't go right up to the wall because the window has handles that obstruct). So my question is: how do I install this drywall? I don't see a problem with the track as that goes on the floor and ceiling but my question pertains to the studs. Can I screw studs to the west and east drywall structure or can you only screw studs to a solid wall? If so, how do I get around this?

 
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11-16-14, 01:23 PM   #2  
You are using 4 layers of sheetrock for a reason? Hopefully not for insulation, nor for sound deadening, since you won't have those benefits if they are coupled to each other. Are you using a decoupling method in your installation? Oh, welcome to the forums!

 
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11-17-14, 01:03 AM   #3  
Hi Chandler. Thanks for your reply. In the diagram, the yellow is the sheetrock and I think he only used 2 layers of sheetrock with some black vinyl material over the solid walls. On the separating wall that separates the room and passage where the door to the studio is, I believe there are 4 layers of sheetrock (2 on each side). I don't know what method the drywalling person was using but I did a diagram to show what he did. My question was regarding the final wall. I am thinking of doing it myself but not sure how to install it. Can you help out? How do I put up the left and right studs since I am not sure if I can screw them into drywall can I?

 
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11-17-14, 01:26 AM   #4  
Here is another diagram I found. According to this, a stud needs to be attached to another stud. In my example, the join (please see dotted line in my diagram) where I intend to build the drywall is inbetween studs.

thanks in advance for your help

https://imageshack.com/i/pcfcIJiQj

 
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11-17-14, 02:34 AM   #5  
Got it. You can screw the studs to the top and bottom plates independent of the wall behind it as long as the top and bottom plates are securely fastened. Just slide the studs into the cavity of the plates and screw them in. Then you can screw your sheetrock to the studs, tape and finish the corners and joints.

 
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11-17-14, 03:23 AM   #6  
Thanks Chandler. I think I understand. So each stud should be screwed to the plate twice. Once at the top and once at the bottom right? Does this apply to all the studs including the far left and right studs as well? I did see some videos where only the outer studs were screwed to the plates andn ot the inner studs. Not sure if this is true or not.

 
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11-17-14, 03:26 AM   #7  
All studs need to be screwed to both plates. Otherwise they would move when installing drywall.

 
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11-17-14, 03:41 AM   #8  
Thanks for your reply. Please see the following @ 1:38 into the video. It is in spanish but clearly stipulates that you should not screw the studs into the plates due to changes in climate. Please could you please clarify?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MCkfZFy_T4

 
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11-17-14, 03:48 AM   #9  
Wait for the experts was going the way wood is done.

 
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11-17-14, 03:56 AM   #10  
I have stipulated that I am using steel framing. I would really appreciate accurate advice as I am a beginner.

thank you

 
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11-17-14, 04:24 AM   #11  
You obviously have movable tectonic plate action due to your soil conditions. Do your other walls in the house float? Normal installation in this country would not allow for small gaps, but movable wall segments, since the movement can be an inch or more. What type panels are they using? Are they made for sound deadening? If so, the method they are using by NOT screwing the studs is to decouple the wall from the sound source. Follow their instructions since it is indigenous to your country.

 
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11-17-14, 04:42 AM   #12  
Nope. No earthquakes here. I see many videos have contradicting practices so I am going to go with what you suggest and screw the studs into the the steel plates/tracks. This will mean that the new wall will not in anyway join onto the left and right walls. Please see image below. this is what you are suggesting right?

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11-17-14, 03:12 PM   #13  
Yes, the metal studs will not be attached to the side sheetrock, but the sheetrock you add to the studs can be finished in the corners to prevent air infiltration.

 
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11-18-14, 12:13 AM   #14  
Thanks a million Chandler. May I ask why I shouldn't join the left and right studs of the new wall to the track/plates of the perpindicular drywall? That would provide extra support woudn't it?

 
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11-18-14, 03:43 AM   #15  
You CAN do that. I was under the impression you didn't want to do that. Your support will come from the fastening of the top and bottom plates, and the side fastening may help if you have tall ceilings, but otherwise would be redundant.

 
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11-18-14, 01:18 PM   #16  
I just want the most support possible because I will have double sheetrock and vinyl inbetween the sheets which weighs quite a bit. What screws should I use if I want to screw the studs this way?

 
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11-18-14, 02:56 PM   #17  
1 5/8" fine thread sheetrock screws to penetrate the metal.

 
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11-18-14, 03:14 PM   #18  
Jumping in late here but I work a lot around steel studs.

You only attach the studs to the track, top and bottom on one side, not both. The studs at the end of the wall, where they meet the other wall, can be toe screwed into the drywall. This may not sound like a very strong joint but it works surprisingly well. 1 1/4" fine thread is fine even for 5/8" rock.

If you watch the video fully they are not installing drywall, or at least not the stuff we use in the US. This is likely why they show not to attach the studs to the track.


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11-19-14, 07:25 AM   #19  
better late than never

Have a look here as well at 5.43 onward and please, they also say not to screw:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43spsv0QISc


Also, forgive me if this is a stupid question but, what is toe joint? Is it when you screw diagonal?

 
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11-19-14, 12:42 PM   #20  
Do I need to drill with a drill bit first, or will those goes straight through both sheets of metal?

 
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11-19-14, 12:45 PM   #21  
Get self drilling dry wall screws no drill bit needed

 
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11-19-14, 01:10 PM   #22  
Both the fine thread drywall screws and the screws used on steel framing are self drilling.


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11-19-14, 01:53 PM   #23  
Unless the studs are heavy gauge you should use fine thread sharp points. They hold better than drill points because they don't make as large a hole and the point elongates the depth of the steel.


If the studs are heavy gauge then uise fine thread drill points.

 
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