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Help with first time drywall repair


john_water_heat's Avatar
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12-22-14, 05:48 PM   #1  
Help with first time drywall repair

Hi,

this is my first time trying any sort of repair with drywall.
A picture showing the damaged area is attached.

I chipped away the loose paint and most of an outer layer of what I presume is joint compound.

The 3 things i'd like to point out and get advice on are:
The metal corner bead has some rust on it.
The paper is coming off most of the exposed drywall.
There is a hole near the top of the tub.

The simplest option would be to just start layering on joint compound, but do I need to do more?
Should I remove that drywall paper?Can I just fill up the hole with joint compound?
Do I need to use the mesh tape to get the joint compound to stick?

I was planning to use Sheetrock Lightweight All Purpose Joint Compound

Thanks in advance,
John

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XSleeper's Avatar
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12-22-14, 06:11 PM   #2  
I would recommend you spray a bit of primer on the rusty corner bead. Then I would use "setting compound" for the first coat. Once its dry you can continue with your lightweight joint compound.

Cut any loose paper away, and prime any bare gypsum that's exposed with an oil based primer. Kilz original spray can would suffice. Let it dry very well before you apply the setting compound.

 
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12-23-14, 03:38 AM   #3  
It is important that you cut off the loose paper, if you just pull, it will keep on peeling Wherever the paper is missing it needs to be coated with either an oil base primer or Zinnser's Gardz, since you have rusty cornerbead I'd use an oil base primer. It would be better to brush the primer on as a rattle can won't apply as much primer and you have to deal with containing the overspray.

I also like to use a setting compound as it speeds up the repair process but using premixed j/c will work.

Once done, you'll need to prime the repairs and then caulk between the tub and drywall. It is important to use a latex enamel in bath rms so the wall can repel moisture rather than absorb it [like flat latex is prone to do]


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tightcoat's Avatar
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12-23-14, 01:24 PM   #4  
Maybe I have just not been exposed to enough corner bead but that sure looks like plaster corner bead. Just how thick a fill do you need to make? Can you get closer and still get a focused picture? How old is the house? What is that bump at the bottom of the corner bead?

 
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12-24-14, 06:08 AM   #5  
I went ahead and followed the suggestions.
Cut off the old peeling paper.
Applied Kilz oil-based primer.
Went back to home depot to get "4.3 lb. Easy Sand 5 Lightweight Setting-Type Joint Compound".
This was what came in the smallest package and as the name suggests it sets very fast.

So now I have the first layer of jc on and it did not turn out so bad. Of course its a little uneven and probably not smooth enough to paint. How do I finish the job from here? Do I apply another coat of jc and focus on getting it even and smooth?
This might be difficult with the 5 min jc, but I would prefer not to use the unopened tub of all-purpose jc that I originally planned on using. Or is there a special skim coat I should use?

Do I finish off by sanding the whole area out beyond the edge of the old paint.
I realize I need to caulk before painting.
Should I prime with the kilz oil-based primer even if I plan to use latex finish coat?

To answer the questions tightcoat asked:
The bead is definitely metal
The house is less than 20 years old.
There is a small bump at the bottom of the bead (it may look exaggerated in the picture because the old jc is not fully removed). This will be covered by the trim board.

 
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12-24-14, 09:11 AM   #6  
While I prefer the 20 minute mud, I've never used 5 minute mud [best I can remember] You can use the fast setting mud for the entire repair although the regular already mixed j/c is easier to use and sand. Obviously the smoother you can apply the mud, the less sanding you will have to do. Using a sanding pole, block or basically anything that will hold the sandpaper flat will help you to sand it even. If you just hold the sandpaper in your hand, your fingers will go up/down and make it difficult to make an even level repair.

It's ok to use the oil base kilz to prime the repair. Latex paints adhere fine to oil base primers.


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12-24-14, 09:14 AM   #7  
The setting type compound is not usually the best thing to use for the entire process... it doesn't skim or feather very well and its not the easiest to sand. For these reasons you would use the tub of joint compound.

Take a wide drywall knife and scrape any globs or high spots on your 5 min mud. Then you should be ready to give it a thin smooth coat of joint compound. Each coat you put on now will be thinner than the last, and smoother. Once its smooth then yeah... sand it with a fine sanding sponge. You don't necessarily need to prime it, and you really should use a latex primer if you do prime the wall before you paint. Oil base primer tends to rough up the surface of the drywall paper... requiring you to sand after you prime if you want a smooth wall.

 
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12-24-14, 09:55 AM   #8  
I use five minute mud almost exclusively. Thin coats work better than heavy coats even with fiat mud. Each coat is a little flatter and smoother than the previous. If you must the last coat with water just as it sets you can slick it downs almost as smooth as slick plaster, almost but not quite shiny. If you're u want to sand it should be dry not only set but not dry.

 
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12-24-14, 10:29 AM   #9  
If you must the last coat with water just as it sets you can slick it downs almost as smooth as slick plaster
I believe tightcoat meant mist the last coat with water

I agree a latex primer works best but oil primer is ok if that means you don't have to buy more primer. IMO the primer should always be sanded lightly before applying the top coat


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