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Help with removing heavy wall texture


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04-28-15, 09:55 PM   #1  
Help with removing heavy wall texture

I just purchased a home that has some pretty heavy wall texture applied to several of the walls. Looks like someone bought one of those texture design rollers from menards, put tons of mud on the wall and went to town! It is so thick it spikes out from the walls at least a 1/2 to 3/4 inch in most areas. It has several coats of paint over it.

I need to know the most effective way to scrape this smooth?? doing it with hand scrapers does not seem doable or desirable. Is there a tool that exists that I could buy or rent to get this accomplished? Anyone else ever dealt with this?

Thank you in advance!

Frank

 
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04-28-15, 10:15 PM   #2  
Welcome to the forums.

My first thought is to rent a sander/vacuum combination. It's basically a disc sander attached to a shop vac. Places like Depot rent them.

Here's a good thread that addresses similar concerns....
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...tic-paint.html


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04-29-15, 01:37 AM   #3  
Might be easier to replace drywall.

 
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04-29-15, 02:29 AM   #4  
maybe scraper blade on an oscillating tool. Get most of it off then skim. I think it's easier to put mud on than it is to take it off but you need to try to get at least some of it off first in your case

 
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04-29-15, 02:49 AM   #5  
You might try using a pull scraper [like used for scraping exterior paint] Aggressive sanding doesn't work well over latex paint. Laminating with another layer of drywall is always an option but IMO it's easier and quicker to scrape and skim coat.


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04-29-15, 06:13 AM   #6  
Been there, done that, I gave up and ripped it all down and started over with new drywall.
Two guys, one day and it was all down and rehung.

 
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04-29-15, 08:12 AM   #7  
Understanding that we've not been able to see the offending walls, normally you can scrape the texture and skim coat in less time than it takes to tear out, rehang and finish new drywall.


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04-29-15, 03:07 PM   #8  
How large a total area? It might indeed be less work to remove and replace. Greater material cost than scraping and skimming but maybe less work. Unless this house is old enough that it is plaster, then textured ever to cover up a problem or because someone liked gobs, then maybe as easy to strip once you find the right tool and technique because the plaster will be damaged less by the scraping than drywall will be.

 
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04-30-15, 07:36 PM   #9  
[ATTACH=CONFIG]50033[/ATTACH]

The bathroom, entry, and living room walls are all covered like this. Tearing it all out and rehanging is not an option in my opinion. Somehow mechanically scraping this off, and skimming is the route I think I should take. Just trying to figure out the best way for it to come off. Thank you for all the advice so far. Starting this project in the next couple of days!

Frank

 
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05-01-15, 03:34 AM   #10  
your link doesn't work http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html


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05-01-15, 10:57 PM   #11  
Name:  Bath.jpg
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Sorry, here it is again. I tried doing some scraping today with some different styles of scrapers and there is no way this is happening with just a hand held scraper, I need something mechanical...

 
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05-02-15, 02:49 AM   #12  
What a mess looks like they stood back and threw mud at it. Drywall sander may work. be sure you get one with vacuum.

 
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05-02-15, 04:07 AM   #13  
I'd still go with scraping and skim coating


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05-02-15, 11:30 AM   #14  
How can that work with a couple coats of latex already painted over it? It is quite hard...

 
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05-02-15, 11:42 AM   #15  
Latex paints don't sand well, it heats up and melts when sanded which plugs the sandpaper. IMO scraping is the least amount of work - it will require a fair amount of elbow grease!


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05-02-15, 11:48 AM   #16  
I would agree, but scraping how? Being painted over makes this difficult any direction. We just cant think of any machine/process that will work efficiently/effectively...will take days to scrape with hand scrapers

 
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05-02-15, 11:51 AM   #17  
I don't think hand scraping would be that bad. You wouldn't be trying to scrape it smooth, just remove the peaks so you'll have a better surface to apply the skim coat to.


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05-02-15, 05:45 PM   #18  
I've scraped stuff about this coarse. Is there a chance it could be plaster? That will be harder to scrape if it is plaster. Try sharpening a floor scraper. This will give you more force. I think a scraper blade on an oscillating tool would work. Get off the worst of it then skim it with joint compound. I like setting mud for I can put on multiple coats the same day. I might try a small area with a hammer and chisel and if I think it is bonded well enough I might apply a bonding agent and plaster it. I think I could do that faster than a skim coat. This is not amateur friendly and the bond of the bonding agent is only as good as the bond to the paint and what ever else is there.
I feel your frustration.

 
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05-03-15, 10:14 AM   #19  
It is not plaster, just heavy drywall mud over the original drywall...project starts tomorrow, i will show up with an arsenal of things to try. Wish me luck!

 
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05-03-15, 01:59 PM   #20  
Let us know what works and how it goes.

 
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