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sand between mud coats?


Muddguts's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 18
CANADA

07-13-15, 11:03 AM   #1  
sand between mud coats?

Hello there

So I have scraped off my "popcorn" ceiling. Since the popcorn was going up, I guess the home builders only applied one coat of mud to the tape lines (I've heard that is standard since the popcorn will hide it anyway). As a result, I can now see the tape lines and have to start covering that up before I paint.

I'm assuming that I will have to apply a couple of coats of mud. My question is, do I sand the plaster in between coats?

During the daylight hours the lines are 99% invisible. You just can't see the flaws in the bright light. Come night time and a couple of interior lights are on, it shows up much more. My impatient wife says to just leave it, that I am scrutinizing too much and "who stares up at the ceiling anyway" but I just canny do it!

Would love to hear some feedback and or tips if you readers and experts have the time

 
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marksr's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2005
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TN

07-13-15, 11:09 AM   #2  
Normally only the final coat is sanded but a lot depends on your skill level at applying the j/c.
It normally takes 3 coats of mud to finish drywall, most will only apply 2 coats to the ceiling if it gets textured. Occasionally I've seen only the tape coat used on a ceiling with the builder relying on a heavy coat of texture to do the rest

Don't forget to remove the sanding dust before applying more mud or the primer.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
stickshift's Avatar
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WI

07-13-15, 11:18 AM   #3  
Knock down the big chunks with your knife as you go but only sand after the (anticipated) final coat.

 
arc2v's Avatar
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Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 158
VA

07-27-15, 09:17 AM   #4  
I sand between coats (coarse) but only to compensate for my lack of skills. I usually end up with chatter ripples or lump squeezeout, especially when doing corners. For straight seams, I usually don't have to sand, as those are a lot easier to do.

If it's just a few boogers, I knock it down with the knife.

 
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