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Plaster and sand seam where drywall meets cement backer?

Plaster and sand seam where drywall meets cement backer?

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  #1  
Old 08-16-15, 02:33 PM
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Plaster and sand seam where drywall meets cement backer?

Hello,
I just recently finished tiling a tub surround. The Cement backer extends about a half inch past the actual edge of the tile on the side and about a quarter inch around the top of the tiled surround. The seem where CBU meets drywall is taped and sealed with thinset. What is the best way to smooth out this transition? Would I use plaster and sand it down? Then spray with texture spray?
Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-16-15, 03:20 PM
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Post a picture so we can see what your seeing.
Last thing you want in a bathroom or kitchen is textured anything, just makes it impossible to clean and hard to repair.
Why would you want to use plaster to repair a drywall seam?
 
  #3  
Old 08-16-15, 04:59 PM
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Cool

I have a couple ideas that I think will stand the possible moisture Around the surround. I am waiting for a picture or two to see if I am right
 
  #4  
Old 08-16-15, 09:21 PM
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I will post a few pics when I get home. It looks to me like the answer is going to be joint compound and a taping knife. If this is correct, do you sand joint compound once it dries? Can you spray texture over it to blend with the wall?
 
  #5  
Old 08-17-15, 03:44 AM
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Yes, j/c can and should be sanded when dry. Don't forget to remove the dust prior to priming! It can also be textured when/as needed. Setting compounds like durabond are water resistant although harder to sand. Regular j/c is water soluble although the primer and enamel paint should give it enough protection.
 
  #6  
Old 08-17-15, 03:46 PM
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I can't figure out how to post pic from phone.
 
  #7  
Old 08-17-15, 04:37 PM
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Westpac Materials 1-Gal. All-Purpose Pre-Mixed Joint Compound-18680H - The Home Depot

So, it sounds like I am going to get some joint compound instead of drywall set compound. Then apply a skim coat over the joint extending a couple inches past, let it dry and sand smooth with 220 grit. Then, go back over it a second time with a thin coat that extends a little further out than the first, then sand that down once it dries. Then spray on some texture, then prime and it is ready to be painted right? Thanks for the help!!
 
  #8  
Old 08-17-15, 06:33 PM
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I sure would like to know what texture your walls have. Maybe, just maybe, what you are calling texture is the little bit of texture left behind the paint roller. I have seen bathrooms with an orange peel but I sure would think twice aabout it. Do the work as yu describe then prime and paint with a good moisture resistant paint. maybe a couple of coats. That might provide all the texture you need to match the existing. Only you know what is on there now.
 
  #9  
Old 08-18-15, 03:47 AM
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IMO you never need 220 grit for sanding j/c. Generally anything from 100-150 grit will work fine. Any scratches that the sandpaper puts in j/c will be filled by the latex primer/paint. I only sand the final coat of j/c but I suppose a lot is determined by how smooth/rough the mud is applied.

I've painted a lot of bath rms that had either orange peel or knockdown texture on the walls. TC is right though that it could be roller stipple. I generally use a light orange peel texture when repairing walls that have roller stipple as that is quicker than duplicating multiple coats of rolled on paint.

I've heard that posting pics from a phone can be problematic can you post one from a pc?
Hopefully someone more technologically advanced than me can give you some advice for posting from a phone.
 
  #10  
Old 08-18-15, 10:40 AM
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Name:  20150817_130757.jpg
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Size:  11.0 KB Here is a photo, I hope it works!
 
  #11  
Old 08-18-15, 10:44 AM
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would it be ok to just spackle? Then maybe spray with a light orange peel type texture and prime?
 
  #12  
Old 08-18-15, 10:50 AM
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Joint compound is what you want, spackle is just meant for covering small holes.

Then prime, texture and paint.

You usually only sand joint compound once and that's after you're finished applying the last coat.
 
  #13  
Old 08-18-15, 02:33 PM
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I'd sand that area with 80 grit, skim it with a thin coat of j/c, sand with 120 grit when dry, remove the dust, texture with orange peel [either thinned down j/c sprayed with a hopper or patted on with a sponge or you can get orange peel in an aerosol can] prime and paint.
 
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