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Cyclic Crack, interior Dry Wall, what to do?

Cyclic Crack, interior Dry Wall, what to do?

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  #1  
Old 10-31-15, 10:09 AM
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Cyclic Crack, interior Dry Wall, what to do?

So we are looking to paint, and earlier this year had noticed a significant crack 3/4 inch at the baseboards tapering and disappearing about halfway up the wall. So we put painting the room on the back burner until I got to fixing the crack and then we could paint.

Today I go to patch the crack, and its gone. There is still a hairline crack there, but the crack seems to have shifted back together leaving only the tiny crack that demonstrates the walls separated at some point.

I have no idea how to proceed. Should I just patch what little crack there is, paint, and deal with it again if it opens up ?

(We have only been in the house a couple years, hadn't noticed the crack before, house was built in 1991, the corner that is cracking is an interior wall, but on the exterior of the house, in the middle of the house near the side door)
 
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  #2  
Old 10-31-15, 11:34 AM
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My guess would be a moisture issue and something isn't fastened securely. The pros will be along, but basically, patching would be useless without fixing the problem. Some pictures would help.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 10-31-15, 11:54 AM
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Pictures ... I have cleaned out the lose junk in the corner now ... you can see the nails in the dry wall edge have pulled through.

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Last edited by PJmax; 10-31-15 at 06:07 PM. Reason: reoriented pics
  #4  
Old 10-31-15, 01:46 PM
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Being in a corner it looks like they did not secure the interior wall to the exterior wall. Do you see the same cracking on the other side?

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 10-31-15, 01:58 PM
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The other side of the interior wall does not seem to have the same cracking no. Though the corner does look like it's been repaired at some point as well.
 
  #6  
Old 10-31-15, 02:20 PM
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The correct fix would be to scrape out any loose material and then tape and finish ........ but you could probably get by with just caulking the crack.

Cracks will often expand/contract with humidity changes.
 
  #7  
Old 10-31-15, 04:13 PM
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Thinking about this some more, when an interior wall is installed against an exterior wall in a "T" fashion, the most common method uses a cap plate, as part of a double top plate, to lock the two wall together "at the top". However, there is only one bottom plate which gets nailed to the floor and possible to a joist below if they are lucky. Since the wall seems to be separating more at the bottom, my guess is, they failed to use enough nails to hold the bottom plate in place.

Hopefully some of the better carpenters will comment, but you might be able to improve that corner simply by driving a few nails (maybe screws) into the bottom plate to securely fasten it to the floor under the wall.

Since the crack has now closed, which would correspond to cooler dryer weather, now would be a good time to anchor it.

Caution as always to be sure there are no wires or plumbing in the way.

Bud
 
  #8  
Old 10-31-15, 05:56 PM
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Bud, wanted to say thanks, that is a great piece of reasoning, intuitively, that seems to make sense. I am no carpenter, but to me that seems pretty darn logical. I guess the question would be how would I get in there to drive some nails/screws in place. I am guessing this would involve removing some of the drywall ???

Jason
 
  #9  
Old 11-01-15, 03:19 AM
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If you have visual access from below that would help you identify any electrical wiring concerns. We do see an receptacle next to that corner.

Since you have to repair the corner anyway, removing a small section of wall wouldn't add that much more work. How to patch advice is available. Others will comment as they wake up from enjoying the extra hour this morning .

Bud
 
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