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Compound and mesh bump showing after drywall patch

Compound and mesh bump showing after drywall patch

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  #1  
Old 11-17-15, 12:46 PM
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Compound and mesh bump showing after drywall patch

Hi there,

My husband and I thought we could do our own drywall patchwork - but unfortunately it looks like an amateur DIY job.

We cut out a 1.5' x 2' drywall hole in order to add additional wall support between studs for our TV wall mount. This is also on the exterior wall so there's insulation behind the drywall. When we patched up the drywall, we put on way too much compound over the mesh tape (yes, we did put it on with thin layers). After sanding, hubby decided to give it a coat of paint to see what it would look like. Unfortuantely it doesn't look very good.

What's the best way of repairing this? Should we add in more compound with a 10" putty knife and try to smooth everything over? Or should we try to scrape off the compound and mesh tape to try again? Or should we cut out 3" on each side of the drywall insert and redo the entire patch?

Thank you in advance for your help!

Many thanks,
Kim

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  #2  
Old 11-17-15, 12:56 PM
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If it was me, I would add more compound, very thin, and feather out beyond your patch by about 5". Do it in several layers drying overnight and sand when you are done. The feathering will eliminate the noticeable bulge. When you paint, gloss paint shows more defects than eggshell will. Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 11-17-15, 01:07 PM
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The first mistake you made was in using mesh tape. Paper tape is both stronger and thinner so it makes a smoother joint.

You need to first apply the compound to the joint with a 3 inch knife and then embed the tape into this "bed" of compound, squeezing almost all of the compound out from under the tape. Use the knife to remove all of the excess compound and then let it harden. Then using a six inch knife go over the tape and wall board with another thin layer of compound let it harden. Then use no less than a 12 inch knife go over with another thin layer, feathering out the compound at the outer edges. Keep doing this along with sanding until the surface is smooth.
 
  #4  
Old 11-17-15, 01:29 PM
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A 12" knife is ideal but hard for many people to use without experience. I have used 8" and been light with touch to get results. Other than that Firs is correct. But all is not lost using mesh. I have used both but mostly use mesh when filxing reoccurring cracks in plaster after filling in cracks in plaster with a thin layer of caulk to fill in the crack after opening it up more.
 
  #5  
Old 11-17-15, 01:39 PM
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Mesh tape has a bad track record when used with regular joint compound, not so bad if a setting compound is used.

I agree with feathering out the patch further. It's difficult to make much headway sanding over latex paint although it wouldn't hurt to sand a little so the j/c will bond better. When you think you've got it right, shine a bright light on the repair and view it from an angle. That will give you a better idea of how well you've done. Improper drywall repairs never improve with paint.
 
  #6  
Old 11-17-15, 01:40 PM
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A little extra advice for you. Before you decide to cover what is there or start all over, you need to judge how bad that really is. Use a 4' level or 4' straight piece of wood and place it over that patch. Resting the middle of the level on the highest spot of the patch, judge how far off of the wall the ends are. IMO, if the ends are each 1/8th off of the wall, you will need to start over. A pro could feather it out to a 5' circle and it would be pretty good. But for a beginner, you are off to a bad start that will just become a bigger bad spot.

Drywall is inexpensive and this will be a spot you will have to live with for a long time. If you make it perfect it will be a point of pride every time you look at it. The difference between this attempt and the next will be many coaches.

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 11-17-15, 01:55 PM
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If I were doing it, I would be using a 16" finishing trowel and feather the whole thing out about 24" around the patch.

I also have to ask. If you are mounting the TV over this, why not just leave it since it will be covered? You are going to have more repairs to do if the TV is ever removed anyway.
 
  #8  
Old 11-17-15, 04:07 PM
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Remove the j-hook on the wall and any other obstruction that will keepyou from feathering out as far as necessary to fix this repair. I use a 20 minute mud so I can do the patch in a relatively short time as it dries by chemical reaction not evaporation. Use a flash light held tight to the wall shining across the repair as you are working to show you peaks and valleys that need attention. I never use an 8" knife, I go from 6" to embed the tape and jump straight to the 12". It is more flexible and you can bend the knife while pulling your compound to feather a smoother edge.
 
  #9  
Old 11-18-15, 05:01 AM
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Thank you all so much for your responses.

We sanded through the paint and most of the compound (almost to the mesh). We then put on a thin layer of compound with a 6" knife to set overnight. We'll apply another coat tonight and try to feather it out as much as we can with a larger knife. I'm hoping it works this time, and if not, will have to call in a handyman!

As for keeping it as is since it'll be behind a TV wall mount, the mess still shows as we purchased a full-tilting mount.
 
  #10  
Old 11-18-15, 05:18 AM
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Use the level approach I described to identify where you need to build up beyond the high center area. If you add more compound over the center, you will need to expend the work farther out. On a straight seam, I will often apply a layer on each side but not in the center. For your square patch the level will tell you where it needs to be filled, never too much at a time.

Bud
 
  #11  
Old 11-18-15, 06:39 AM
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I always figured it was better to apply an extra coat [thin] of mud than apply it too heavy and have to do extra sanding.
 
  #12  
Old 11-23-15, 09:34 AM
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Thank you all for your help. After lots of sanding and thin layers of compound, we managed to get the wall back in good shape! The photo was taken just after the second coat of paint.
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  #13  
Old 11-23-15, 09:38 AM
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That looks very good, now your friends and relatives can have you over to do their drywall repairs .

Bud
 
  #14  
Old 11-23-15, 12:42 PM
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Well done!! It only gets easier from this point forward.
 
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