Am I on the right track?


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Old 11-24-15, 08:52 PM
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Am I on the right track?

Long story short some horseplay led to an indentation in the wall. It's not deep enough for a patch (I don't think) and there isn't a hole, it's just 'pushed in' about a quarter of an inch, if that. I might have gone a little heavy on the speckle, but when I tried to sand it after letting it sit for slightly less than two hours it was still tacky and was coming off still moist. So I'm going to leave it overnight and finish the job tomorrow afternoon. I have a 120 and 180 grit sandpaper block for sanding and I used all-purpose DAP on the indentation itself. Will 17 or so hours be enough time for this to dry so it can be sanded and painted? The lighter painted area is the paint I bought which the dude at Home Depot thought might match. Obviously it doesn't, but first things first. I need to get this area dry and ready to be sanded. I'll get the correct color paint tomorrow. Below is a pic of what I'm working on. Thoughts? Thanks in advance.

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Old 11-25-15, 03:30 AM
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You used way too much spackle & you didn't wait long enough, to sand. 17 hrs will be fine.
 
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Old 11-25-15, 04:45 AM
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Rule #1, when working on drywall repairs, use thin coats.
Should have used a drywall knife wider then the area to be repaired, one swipe and your done with that coat, let it dry (yours is so think it's going to take longer to dry) light sanding in a ciruler motion, then run your hand over it to feel for flaws.
No paint or primer is going to fix low or high areas.
It may take more then one coat.
Want an exact match for the paint cut out a 1"square of just the the paper on the drywall and take it with you when buying the paint.
Repairs should be primed before painting, not just painted, no primer and paint in one.
Use more of the drywall compound to repair where you cut out the patch.
 
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Old 11-25-15, 04:58 AM
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Spackling is for minor repairs and doesn't preform well when applied thickly or over large areas .... but it might still be ok for your repair. I'd scrape off the excess and then respackle as needed. Joint compound is best for larger repairs and can also be thinned downed to make the texture. Thinning j/c to paint consistency and patting it on with a sponge should replicate the orange peel texture. Or you could buy a spray can of orange peel texture.

It's next to impossible to get a good paint match if you don't use the same brand/line of paint. If you don't know what was originally used it would be best to get a close match and repaint the wall in question.
 
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Old 11-25-15, 05:00 AM
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Spackle is not meant to fill holes any larger than say a nail hole. You need to remove what you have and go back with joint compound. They sell small boxes of setting type joint compound. It will come in a small box - powder form - that you mix a small batch and spread it on. You then have to sponge to blend it into the texture. Later you can work on applying texture to blend.
 

Last edited by czizzi; 11-25-15 at 05:01 AM. Reason: Mark and I posted at the same time
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Old 11-25-15, 05:15 AM
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t's just 'pushed in' about a quarter of an inch, if that.
He said it was a 1/4". There are about 8" of spackle, on the wall.
 
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Old 11-25-15, 05:21 AM
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Not having seen the damage, I believe spackling would have been ok IF it was only applied to the indentation.

The fix is still the same - remove the excess spackle. While ready mix j/c is water soluble I don't know if spackling is [I always use j/c] but the odds are you can't remove enough of the spackling to bring it back to a small repair. I'd scrape off the excess, add j/c as needed, sand, texture and prime/paint.
 
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Old 11-29-15, 09:24 PM
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Thanks for the replies everyone. My apologies on getting back to you so late as I've been quite busy. I realized after reading the input here that I used far too much spackle. I've never patched anything before, so this is all new to me. Anyways, I took your advice and went back to square one. I had painted the wall and had an obvious "high spot" due to overapplication of the spackle. I went back and sanded down the paint and excess spackle. This required some scraping with the putty knife to get some of the paint off, but once I got all the high spots down it looked much better. I then applied an extremely thin layer of spackle to even out a couple small dimples and made sure to remove any and all excess this time. Worked great. I've sanded it down once again and I'm gonna let it sit overnight and then apply paint/primer in the morning.

My last question is, when I went to Home Depot to purchase the supplies I needed for the job I was told to get matte interior Behr Marquee which is a paint and primer in one. I brought a small sample, as someone suggested, and we got it pretty damn close to the original. I'm pleased with the color match. The room was already painted 20+ years ago when I moved in and all things considered we did the best we could on the paint. Can I still use this Behr Marquee and purchase a separate Behr interior primer tomorrow to use as a base coat? Or will that be too much primer, if that's possible? The wall, surrounding the area I patched where I sanded, is quite glossy and slick to the touch, but it's completely even now. Glad this project is almost over and I went back and fixed it the best I could. It should turn out much better this time around. You live and learn. Thanks again for all the feedback.
 
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Old 11-30-15, 06:17 AM
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I'm a little confused The wall paint is glossy but the touch up paint is matte ???
Ideally you'd use a separate primer but to keep from buying an extra can you can get by with thinning some of the finish paint 10% and using it for the primer. I don't recommend this for large repairs but it should be ok for a minor repair.
 
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Old 11-30-15, 07:21 AM
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Looks like a little texture will be needed
 
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Old 11-30-15, 08:33 AM
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Not what you asked but you generally get better advice and products at a paint store than a paint department.
 
 

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